News

News

Browse our news stories to read about how EPIC-funded research is helping the state expand the use of renewable energy; build a safe and resilient electricity system; advance electric technologies for buildings, businesses, and transportation; enable a more decentralized electric grid; improve the affordability, health, and comfort of California’s communities; and support California’s local economies and businesses.

Latest News

Investigate Climate Vulnerability of the Natural Gas System and Identify Resilience Options in the San Diego Area

30776
ICF Incorporated, L.L.C.
0
Closed
PIR-15-004
a:84:{s:9:"ProjectID";s:5:"30776";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"PIR-15-004";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:18:"SolicitationNumber";s:10:"PON-14-507";s:7:"Company";s:24:"ICF Incorporated, L.L.C.";s:12:"ProjectTitle";s:113:"Investigate Climate Vulnerability of the Natural Gas System and Identify Resilience Options in the San Diego Area";s:13:"ProjectAmount";s:11:"456703.0000";s:11:"MatchAmount";s:11:"166200.0000";s:16:"EncumberedAmount";s:11:"456703.0000";s:19:"GrossInvoicedAmount";s:11:"445430.6500";s:15:"LeveragedAmount";s:5:".0000";s:9:"AwardDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:9:"StartDate";s:19:"2016-01-12 00:00:00";s:7:"EndDate";s:19:"2018-05-30 00:00:00";s:13:"ActualEndDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:13:"ProjectStatus";s:6:"Closed";s:14:"InvestmentPlan";N;s:14:"InvestmentArea";s:39:"Energy-Related Environmental Research; ";s:18:"StrategicObjective";s:0:"";s:7:"Program";s:11:"Natural Gas";s:11:"ProgramArea";s:18:"Environmental Area";s:10:"ValueChain";s:12:"Distribution";s:9:"Customers";s:80:"Energy Providers : Natural Gas Utilities~ Empower California : Small Businesses~";s:6:"Topics";s:59:"Environment and Climate Change : Climate Change Adaptation~";s:18:"ProjectDescription";s:834:"The goal of the project is to develop an understanding of climate-related hazard vulnerability and adaptation options in the San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) territory at a level of detail appropriate for informing energy sector policy and planning. The recipient is partnering with SDG&E to conduct a detailed, robust climate change vulnerability assessment and identify and evaluate appropriate adaptation measures. Possible adaptation measures are determined using literature reviews, interviews with key experts, modeling, and workshop elicitation. Potential direct and indirect impacts and adaptation measures are evaluated at an asset-by-asset level, and through system wide assessment. This provides a suite of practical, actionable climate change adaptation measures optimized to SDG&E's natural gas system and customer needs.";s:5:"Issue";s:617:"Energy infrastructure in California's low-lying coastal zones and rugged inland terrain could be adversely impacted by permanent inundation from sea level rise, coastal flooding, or in inland zones vulnerable to landslides, wildfires, and inland flooding. However, detailed information on the threats is often insufficient to inform action, beyond resilience measures that would be undertaken for non-climate reasons. This project improves understanding of vulnerabilities and adaptation measures for natural gas infrastructure within the SDG&E territory so that appropriate policy and planning decisions can be made.";s:13:"ProjectUpdate";N;s:12:"BenefitsDesc";s:475:"SDG&E (a funding partner for this project) will use this research to identify feasible climate adaptation measures that will increase reliability and lower overall costs to the utility and its ratepayers. SDG&E is also sharing the results of this study with the U.S. Department of Energy via its Partnership for Energy Sector Climate Resilience, which is being coordinated with the California Public Utilities Commission/California Energy Commission Adaptation Working Group.";s:15:"SpecBenConsumer";s:0:"";s:12:"SpecBenCosts";s:168:"Cost savings to ratepayers will be realized by avoided costs of damage and service disruptions from climate change impacts, as well as avoided costs from over adapting.";s:15:"SpecBenEconomic";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenEnvironment";s:0:"";s:13:"SpecBenHealth";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenReliability";s:257:"The conclusion from the study will assist SDG&E and other utilities with preparing adaptation plans to climate change, to improve reliability of natural gas service. SDG&E will be able to avoid some service interruption resulting from climate change impacts";s:13:"SpecBenSafety";s:0:"";s:15:"SpecBenSecurity";s:0:"";s:7:"Results";s:0:"";s:18:"HighlightStatement";s:101:"Identifying adaptation measure to reduce vulnerabilities of the natural gas system to climate impacts";s:20:"LeverageContributors";N;s:13:"MatchPartners";s:38:"San Diego Gas & Electric Company; ";s:14:"Subcontractors";s:16:"Revell Coastal; ";s:15:"LocationAddress";s:12:"9300 Lee Hwy";s:12:"LocationCity";s:7:"Fairfax";s:13:"LocationState";s:2:"VA";s:15:"LocationZipCode";s:5:"22031";s:14:"LocationCounty";N;s:30:"LocationCalEnviroDisadvantaged";s:3:"N/A";s:17:"LocationLowIncome";s:3:"N/A";s:22:"LocationNativeAmerican";s:0:"";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:0:"";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:0:"";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:0:"";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:0:"";s:13:"SiteLocations";s:28:"Irvine, CA; San Diego, CA; ";s:12:"SiteCounties";s:20:"Orange; San Diego; ";s:13:"SiteUtilities";s:0:"";s:12:"CECMgrFirstN";s:2:"Yu";s:11:"CECMgrLastN";s:3:"Hou";s:19:"CECMgrNameFormatted";s:7:"Hou, Yu";s:11:"CECMgrPhone";s:12:"916-776-0772";s:11:"CECMgrEmail";s:20:"yu.hou@energy.ca.gov";s:19:"CECMgrPositionTitle";s:32:"Energy Commission Specialist III";s:12:"CECMgrOffice";N;s:20:"CompanyContactFirstN";s:6:"Andrew";s:19:"CompanyContactLastN";s:6:"Petrow";s:19:"CompanyContactEmail";s:22:"Andrew.Petrow@idfi.com";s:19:"CompanyContactTitle";s:0:"";s:9:"CompSmBus";s:3:"N/A";s:12:"CompMicroBus";s:3:"N/A";s:8:"CompDVBE";s:3:"N/A";s:14:"CompWomanOwned";s:2:"No";s:17:"CompMinorityOwned";s:2:"No";s:13:"CompLGBTOwned";s:2:"No";s:19:"IsNoteWorthyProject";s:1:"0";s:17:"FinalReportStatus";s:9:"Completed";s:10:"IsDisabled";s:1:"0";s:10:"Technology";s:0:"";s:9:"Ecosystem";s:0:"";s:29:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaPrime";s:30:"Resiliency, Health, and Safety";s:33:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaSecondary";s:0:"";s:21:"PolicyInnovationGroup";s:0:"";s:16:"FinalReportTitle";s:125:"Potential Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Actions for Gas Assets in the San Diego Gas and Electric Company Service Area";s:19:"FinalReportLinkAddr";s:91:"http://www.climateassessment.ca.gov/techreports/docs/20180827-Energy_CCCA4-CEC-2018-009.pdf";s:5:"sites";a:2:{i:2499;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"2499";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"PIR-15-004";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:5:"17105";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"2";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:0:"";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:8:"Research";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:3:"EUC";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2013-02-07 00:00:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:7:"lkinser";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2018-10-10 15:03:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:8:"jpatters";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:5:"17105";s:11:"AddressType";s:12:"Headquarters";s:7:"Address";s:7:"Various";s:8:"Address2";s:0:"";s:4:"City";s:9:"San Diego";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:5:"92093";s:7:"ZipFive";s:5:"92093";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:2:"39";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:2:"78";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:2:"52";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-117.222343";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"32.885317";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:2:"25";s:6:"County";s:9:"San Diego";s:6:"Region";s:5:"South";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:2:"No";s:9:"LowIncome";s:0:"";}i:2091;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"2091";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"PIR-15-004";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:5:"28169";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"1";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:0:"";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:8:"Research";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:0:"";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2015-05-27 11:20:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:8:"zdextraz";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2018-08-06 09:50:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:4:"yhou";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:5:"28169";s:11:"AddressType";s:12:"Headquarters";s:7:"Address";s:13:"1 Ada Ste 100";s:8:"Address2";s:9:"Suite 100";s:4:"City";s:6:"Irvine";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:9:"926185339";s:7:"ZipFive";s:5:"92618";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:2:"37";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:2:"68";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:2:"45";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-117.734138";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"33.668191";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:2:"31";s:6:"County";s:6:"Orange";s:6:"Region";s:5:"South";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:2:"No";s:9:"LowIncome";s:0:"";}}}

Fairfax, VA

Project Member

Andrew Petrow

Rocket

Revell Coastal

Rocket
Rocket

San Diego Gas &amp

Rocket

Electric Company

Rocket
Lower Costs

Affordability

Cost savings to ratepayers will be realized by avoided costs of damage and service disruptions from climate change impacts, as well as avoided costs from over adapting.

Greater Reliability

Reliability

The conclusion from the study will assist SDG&E and other utilities with preparing adaptation plans to climate change, to improve reliability of natural gas service. SDG&E will be able to avoid some service interruption resulting from climate change impacts

Energy infrastructure in California's low-lying coastal zones and rugged inland terrain could be adversely impacted by permanent inundation from sea level rise, coastal flooding, or in inland zones vulnerable to landslides, wildfires, and inland flooding. However, detailed information on the threats is often insufficient to inform action, beyond resilience measures that would be undertaken for non-climate reasons. This project improves understanding of vulnerabilities and adaptation measures for natural gas infrastructure within the SDG&E territory so that appropriate policy and planning decisions can be made.

The goal of the project is to develop an understanding of climate-related hazard vulnerability and adaptation options in the San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) territory at a level of detail appropriate for informing energy sector policy and planning. The recipient is partnering with SDG&E to conduct a detailed, robust climate change vulnerability assessment and identify and evaluate appropriate adaptation measures. Possible adaptation measures are determined using literature reviews, interviews with key experts, modeling, and workshop elicitation. Potential direct and indirect impacts and adaptation measures are evaluated at an asset-by-asset level, and through system wide assessment. This provides a suite of practical, actionable climate change adaptation measures optimized to SDG&E's natural gas system and customer needs.

By analyzing potential climate change-driven impacts to the San Diego area gas system, the research team generated flexible adaptation pathways to help utilities adapt to climate change hazards while managing uncertainty. The results show many gas assets will potentially experience increased exposure to sea level rise-driven coastal hazards, wildfire, extreme heat, inland flooding, and landslides. Overall, natural gas assets and services are expected to experience limited impacts from the climate hazards investigated in this study. The team developed flexible adaptation pathways. The pathway is created to manage uncertainty by making and adjusting adaptation decisions as new information on climate and non-climate variables becomes available. The project is part of the California 4th climate assessment. The final report will be part of the assessment reports published in late 2018.

SDG&E (a funding partner for this project) will use this research to identify feasible climate adaptation measures that will increase reliability and lower overall costs to the utility and its ratepayers. SDG&E is also sharing the results of this study with the U.S. Department of Energy via its Partnership for Energy Sector Climate Resilience, which is being coordinated with the California Public Utilities Commission/California Energy Commission Adaptation Working Group.

Identifying adaptation measure to reduce vulnerabilities of the natural gas system to climate impacts

icon
$456,703
$166,200
$445,431
0
0

San Diego, CA

Irvine, CA

Project Owners
Project Managers

Assessment of Fugitive Emissions from the Natural Gas System-Commercial Buildings

30779
Institute of Gas Technology dba GTI Energy
1
Ended
PIR-15-003
a:84:{s:9:"ProjectID";s:5:"30779";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"PIR-15-003";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:18:"SolicitationNumber";s:10:"PON-14-507";s:7:"Company";s:42:"Institute of Gas Technology dba GTI Energy";s:12:"ProjectTitle";s:81:"Assessment of Fugitive Emissions from the Natural Gas System-Commercial Buildings";s:13:"ProjectAmount";s:11:"599891.0000";s:11:"MatchAmount";s:5:".0000";s:16:"EncumberedAmount";s:11:"599891.0000";s:19:"GrossInvoicedAmount";s:11:"579829.5600";s:15:"LeveragedAmount";s:5:".0000";s:9:"AwardDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:9:"StartDate";s:19:"2016-01-04 00:00:00";s:7:"EndDate";s:19:"2019-03-29 00:00:00";s:13:"ActualEndDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:13:"ProjectStatus";s:5:"Ended";s:14:"InvestmentPlan";N;s:14:"InvestmentArea";s:39:"Energy-Related Environmental Research; ";s:18:"StrategicObjective";s:0:"";s:7:"Program";s:11:"Natural Gas";s:11:"ProgramArea";s:18:"Environmental Area";s:10:"ValueChain";s:12:"Distribution";s:9:"Customers";s:36:"Commercial Businesses : Restaurants~";s:6:"Topics";s:60:"Environment and Climate Change : Fugitive Methane Emissions~";s:18:"ProjectDescription";s:602:"This project developed and validated a field method to measure after-meter methane leakage from natural gas-fired appliances and gas piping. The researchers took field measurements at 20 commercial food service sites and two inpatient healthcare facilities in California. Using data collected from these buildings, the project team performed a variety of statistical analyses to estimate the magnitude of methane emissions from the food service sector for several scenarios. These scenarios include cities and regions that have different numbers of food service sites with different sizes of operation.";s:5:"Issue";s:380:"California has initiated efforts for quantifying emissions for some sources of emissions, such as natural gas pipelines. However, experts recognize that emissions from other sources, such as commercial buildings, have not been well characterized. This project is essential to providing the necessary information to measure and quantify methane emissions from commercial buildings.";s:13:"ProjectUpdate";N;s:12:"BenefitsDesc";s:414:"This project collected methane emission data from California's commercial building sector. This is the first time emissions from this sector have been systematically studied. The findings from this study were shared with the California Air Resources Board to improve estimations of methane emissions from buildings, which are essential to ensure that the State develops well-informed emission reduction strategies.";s:15:"SpecBenConsumer";s:0:"";s:12:"SpecBenCosts";s:0:"";s:15:"SpecBenEconomic";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenEnvironment";s:391:"The project results assist in quantification of after-the-meter methane leakages from commercial sectors. This information will help California's efforts to reduce greenhouse gases by informing the greenhouse gas inventory calculation managed by the California Air Resource Board. This project began the process of better estimating the impact of these sectors on total statewide emissions. ";s:13:"SpecBenHealth";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenReliability";s:0:"";s:13:"SpecBenSafety";s:0:"";s:15:"SpecBenSecurity";s:0:"";s:7:"Results";s:0:"";s:18:"HighlightStatement";s:145:"Developing a field method to plan, conduct, and analyze measurements of fugitive methane leaks/emissions from commercial buildings in California.";s:20:"LeverageContributors";N;s:13:"MatchPartners";s:0:"";s:14:"Subcontractors";s:39:"Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; ";s:15:"LocationAddress";s:24:"1700 S Mount Prospect Rd";s:12:"LocationCity";s:11:"Des Plaines";s:13:"LocationState";s:2:"IL";s:15:"LocationZipCode";s:5:"60018";s:14:"LocationCounty";N;s:30:"LocationCalEnviroDisadvantaged";s:2:"No";s:17:"LocationLowIncome";s:2:"No";s:22:"LocationNativeAmerican";s:3:"N/A";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:0:"";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:0:"";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:0:"";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:0:"";s:13:"SiteLocations";s:25:"Davis, CA; Various, CA; ";s:12:"SiteCounties";s:15:"Solano; Yolo; ";s:13:"SiteUtilities";s:0:"";s:12:"CECMgrFirstN";s:2:"Yu";s:11:"CECMgrLastN";s:3:"Hou";s:19:"CECMgrNameFormatted";s:7:"Hou, Yu";s:11:"CECMgrPhone";s:12:"916-776-0772";s:11:"CECMgrEmail";s:20:"yu.hou@energy.ca.gov";s:19:"CECMgrPositionTitle";s:32:"Energy Commission Specialist III";s:12:"CECMgrOffice";N;s:20:"CompanyContactFirstN";s:5:"Larry";s:19:"CompanyContactLastN";s:5:"Brand";s:19:"CompanyContactEmail";s:29:"Larry.Brand@Gastechnology.org";s:19:"CompanyContactTitle";s:12:"R&D Director";s:9:"CompSmBus";s:3:"N/A";s:12:"CompMicroBus";s:3:"N/A";s:8:"CompDVBE";s:3:"N/A";s:14:"CompWomanOwned";s:2:"No";s:17:"CompMinorityOwned";s:2:"No";s:13:"CompLGBTOwned";s:2:"No";s:19:"IsNoteWorthyProject";s:1:"0";s:17:"FinalReportStatus";s:9:"Completed";s:10:"IsDisabled";s:1:"0";s:10:"Technology";s:0:"";s:9:"Ecosystem";s:0:"";s:29:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaPrime";s:26:"Gas System Decarbonization";s:33:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaSecondary";s:0:"";s:21:"PolicyInnovationGroup";s:0:"";s:16:"FinalReportTitle";s:85:"Assessment of Fugitive Emissions from the Natural Gas System – Commercial Buildings";s:19:"FinalReportLinkAddr";s:80:"https://ww2.energy.ca.gov/2020publications/CEC-500-2020-035/CEC-500-2020-035.pdf";s:5:"sites";a:2:{i:2498;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"2498";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"PIR-15-003";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:4:"3683";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"2";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:0:"";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:8:"Research";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:0:"";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2010-03-24 15:01:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:7:"gkibrya";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2022-01-14 14:13:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:8:"Jrosales";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:4:"3683";s:11:"AddressType";s:12:"Headquarters";s:7:"Address";s:31:"Various locations in California";s:8:"Address2";s:0:"";s:4:"City";s:7:"Various";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:9:"999999999";s:7:"ZipFive";s:5:"99999";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:1:"0";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:1:"0";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:1:"0";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:0:"";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:0:"";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:1:"0";s:6:"County";s:12:"Out Of State";s:6:"Region";s:0:"";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:2:"No";s:9:"LowIncome";s:2:"No";}i:2092;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"2092";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"PIR-15-003";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:5:"28630";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"1";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:0:"";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:8:"Research";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:0:"";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2015-12-02 11:48:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:8:"zdextraz";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2020-12-14 16:04:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:6:"ajacob";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:5:"28630";s:11:"AddressType";s:15:"Mailing Address";s:7:"Address";s:8:"412 F St";s:8:"Address2";s:0:"";s:4:"City";s:5:"Davis";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:9:"956164112";s:7:"ZipFive";N;s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:1:"3";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:1:"4";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:1:"3";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-121.740707";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"38.546244";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:2:"35";s:6:"County";s:4:"Yolo";s:6:"Region";s:5:"North";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:2:"No";s:9:"LowIncome";s:3:"Yes";}}}
Tech Partner
Tech Partner 2

Des Plaines, IL

37th
68th
POINT (-117.752038 33.669764)
Project Member

Larry Brand

R&D Director
Rocket

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Rocket
Environmental & Public Health

Environmental Sustainability

The project results assist in quantification of after-the-meter methane leakages from commercial sectors. This information will help California's efforts to reduce greenhouse gases by informing the greenhouse gas inventory calculation managed by the California Air Resource Board. This project began the process of better estimating the impact of these sectors on total statewide emissions.

California has initiated efforts for quantifying emissions for some sources of emissions, such as natural gas pipelines. However, experts recognize that emissions from other sources, such as commercial buildings, have not been well characterized. This project is essential to providing the necessary information to measure and quantify methane emissions from commercial buildings.

This project developed and validated a field method to measure after-meter methane leakage from natural gas-fired appliances and gas piping. The researchers took field measurements at 20 commercial food service sites and two inpatient healthcare facilities in California. Using data collected from these buildings, the project team performed a variety of statistical analyses to estimate the magnitude of methane emissions from the food service sector for several scenarios. These scenarios include cities and regions that have different numbers of food service sites with different sizes of operation.

The project is completed. The researchers developed measurement techniques for fugitive emissions from piping components and combustion equipment and validated them in the field for most of the commercial equipment encountered. The majority of those fugitive emissions came from a relatively small number of appliance and piping component types. This suggests it may be possible to significantly reduce fugitive emissions from the commercial food service sector by identifying and repairing a relatively small number of problem areas. The results are shared with the California Air Resource Board (CARB). CARB is considering using the results from this study and other Energy Commission funded methane emission studies to improve its GHG inventory.

This project collected methane emission data from California's commercial building sector. This is the first time emissions from this sector have been systematically studied. The findings from this study were shared with the California Air Resources Board to improve estimations of methane emissions from buildings, which are essential to ensure that the State develops well-informed emission reduction strategies.

Developing a field method to plan, conduct, and analyze measurements of fugitive methane leaks/emissions from commercial buildings in California.

icon
$599,891
$0
$579,830
0
0

Various, CA

Davis, CA

Project Owners
Project Managers
Project Users

Open Source Platform For Plug-in Electric Vehicle Smart Charging in California

30804
The Regents of the University of California on behalf of the Berkeley campus
0
Closed
EPC-15-013
a:84:{s:9:"ProjectID";s:5:"30804";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"EPC-15-013";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:18:"SolicitationNumber";s:10:"PON-14-310";s:7:"Company";s:76:"The Regents of the University of California on behalf of the Berkeley campus";s:12:"ProjectTitle";s:78:"Open Source Platform For Plug-in Electric Vehicle Smart Charging in California";s:13:"ProjectAmount";s:12:"1500000.0000";s:11:"MatchAmount";s:10:"90000.0000";s:16:"EncumberedAmount";s:12:"1500000.0000";s:19:"GrossInvoicedAmount";s:12:"1357290.9800";s:15:"LeveragedAmount";s:5:".0000";s:9:"AwardDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:9:"StartDate";s:19:"2016-02-01 00:00:00";s:7:"EndDate";s:19:"2019-01-31 00:00:00";s:13:"ActualEndDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:13:"ProjectStatus";s:6:"Closed";s:14:"InvestmentPlan";s:2:"10";s:14:"InvestmentArea";s:2:"10";s:18:"StrategicObjective";s:0:"";s:7:"Program";s:4:"EPIC";s:11:"ProgramArea";s:14:"Transportation";s:10:"ValueChain";s:22:"Demand-side Management";s:9:"Customers";s:64:"Energy Providers : Electric Utilities and Balancing Authorities~";s:6:"Topics";s:302:"Demand Response : Communication and Standards~ Demand Response : Energy Management Systems~ Demand Response : Renewable Integration~ Public Health and Safety : Ambient Air Pollution~ Smart Grid : Vehicle-Grid Integration~ Storage : Plug-in Electric Vehicles~ Transportation : Plug-in Electric Vehicles~";s:18:"ProjectDescription";s:975:"The project developed a one-way charging concept for PEVs that maximized intermittent renewable generation and minimized impacts to the distribution grid. The project focused on controlling the charging of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in residential and small commercial settings using a novel and flexible open-source, open-software architecture charge communication and control platform. This software-based platform was embedded in the context of overall utility and residential and business electrical and building automation systems, lending itself to potential broad implementation by commercial interests due to its flexible architecture and "agnostic" approach to communications standards. Control strategies and applications were guided by an assessment of user needs and grid operation and ratepayer benefits, and the potential for one-way PEV charge control to lead to increased ability to accept intermittent renewable energy for California's electrical grid.";s:5:"Issue";s:594:"Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) represent a rapidly proliferating new vehicle technology and source of utility grid load. Currently only pilot concepts exist for actively managing PEV charge control for the benefit of California's grid and ratepayers. Meanwhile California's electrical grid is evolving to rely more on intermittent renewable power sources, with different "grid acceptance" issues than more traditional generation sources, driven by the state Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), creating a unique opportunity for PEV charging and the "greening of the grid" to go hand-in-hand. ";s:13:"ProjectUpdate";N;s:12:"BenefitsDesc";s:865:"This project focuses on controlling the charging of plug-in electric vehicles PEVs at residential and small commercial settings using a novel and flexible open-source, open-architecture charge communication and control platform. This XBOS-V platform is embedded in the context of overall utility and residential and business electrical and building automation systems, lending itself to potential broad implementation by commercial interests. This integrated project also focuses on the development of the open-source platform including assessment of user needs and grid operation and ratepayer benefits, grid security considerations, and the potential for PEV charge control to lead to increased ability to accept intermittent renewable energy for California's electrical grid. The platform is flexible to adoption and inclusion of several communication protocols.";s:15:"SpecBenConsumer";s:0:"";s:12:"SpecBenCosts";s:199:"This project is estimated to result in $15 million per year reduction in electricity costs for ratepayers in 2024 from increased PEV charging energy efficiency and lower electricity generation costs.";s:15:"SpecBenEconomic";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenEnvironment";s:224:"This project could reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 72,500 metric tons per year in 2024 from increased PEV charging efficiency and increased fraction of intermittent operationally GHG-free renewable electricity generation.";s:13:"SpecBenHealth";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenReliability";s:675:"This project is expected to increase reliability of the electric distribution grid and reduce frequency of outages in residential areas. Coordinated charging of PEVs in distribution networks could reduce impacts from sudden surges in charging (e.g., PEV owners in large groups set the timing of the charge to coincide with reductions in TOU rates after the evening peak). By coordinating the charge more carefully across utility distribution level nodes, these grid impacts can be greatly minimized based on initial project findings. Managed charging also has the potential to mitigate 500 GWh and 2 TWh of renewable overgeneration curtailment in 2024 and 2030, respectively";s:13:"SpecBenSafety";s:0:"";s:15:"SpecBenSecurity";s:0:"";s:7:"Results";s:0:"";s:18:"HighlightStatement";s:101:"A novel and flexible communication and control for PEVs in residential and small commercial settings.";s:20:"LeverageContributors";N;s:13:"MatchPartners";s:22:"BMW of North America; ";s:14:"Subcontractors";s:22:"BMW of North America; ";s:15:"LocationAddress";s:50:"760 Davis Hall, University Of California, Berkeley";s:12:"LocationCity";s:8:"Berkeley";s:13:"LocationState";s:2:"CA";s:15:"LocationZipCode";s:5:"94720";s:14:"LocationCounty";s:7:"Alameda";s:30:"LocationCalEnviroDisadvantaged";s:2:"No";s:17:"LocationLowIncome";s:2:"No";s:22:"LocationNativeAmerican";s:2:"No";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-122.254943";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"37.873831";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:1:"7";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:2:"14";s:13:"SiteLocations";s:14:"Richmond, CA; ";s:12:"SiteCounties";s:14:"Contra Costa; ";s:13:"SiteUtilities";s:0:"";s:12:"CECMgrFirstN";s:7:"Matthew";s:11:"CECMgrLastN";s:4:"Fung";s:19:"CECMgrNameFormatted";s:13:"Fung, Matthew";s:11:"CECMgrPhone";s:12:"916-776-0757";s:11:"CECMgrEmail";s:19:"mfung@Energy.ca.gov";s:19:"CECMgrPositionTitle";s:19:"Mechanical Engineer";s:12:"CECMgrOffice";N;s:20:"CompanyContactFirstN";s:7:"Timothy";s:19:"CompanyContactLastN";s:6:"Lipman";s:19:"CompanyContactEmail";s:21:"telipman@berkeley.edu";s:19:"CompanyContactTitle";s:22:"Principal Invistigator";s:9:"CompSmBus";s:3:"N/A";s:12:"CompMicroBus";s:3:"N/A";s:8:"CompDVBE";s:3:"N/A";s:14:"CompWomanOwned";s:2:"No";s:17:"CompMinorityOwned";s:2:"No";s:13:"CompLGBTOwned";s:2:"No";s:19:"IsNoteWorthyProject";s:1:"0";s:17:"FinalReportStatus";s:9:"Completed";s:10:"IsDisabled";s:1:"0";s:10:"Technology";s:50:"Vehicle-to-Grid Integration~ Virtual Power Plants~";s:9:"Ecosystem";s:14:"Not Applicable";s:29:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaPrime";s:25:"Low Carbon Transportation";s:33:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaSecondary";s:41:"Grid Decarbonization and Decentralization";s:21:"PolicyInnovationGroup";s:0:"";s:16:"FinalReportTitle";s:106:"Open Source, Open Architecture Software Platform for Plug-In Electric Vehicle Smart Charging in California";s:19:"FinalReportLinkAddr";s:87:"https://ww2.energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport_cms.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2020-005";s:5:"sites";a:1:{i:1908;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"1908";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"EPC-15-013";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:5:"28607";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"1";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:22:"Richmond Field Station";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:8:"Research";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:0:"";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2015-12-01 11:28:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:8:"rgonzale";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2021-01-06 11:35:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:5:"mfung";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:5:"28607";s:11:"AddressType";s:12:"Headquarters";s:7:"Address";s:14:"1301 S 46Th St";s:8:"Address2";s:0:"";s:4:"City";s:8:"Richmond";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:9:"948044600";s:7:"ZipFive";N;s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:1:"9";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:2:"15";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:2:"11";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-122.331938";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"37.915363";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:1:"3";s:6:"County";s:12:"Contra Costa";s:6:"Region";s:5:"North";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:3:"Yes";s:9:"LowIncome";s:2:"No";}}}
-122.254943
37.873831

Berkeley, CA

7th
14th
POINT (-122.254943 37.873831)
Project Member

Timothy Lipman

Principal Invistigator
Rocket

BMW of North America

Rocket
Rocket

BMW of North America

Rocket
Lower Costs

Affordability

This project is estimated to result in $15 million per year reduction in electricity costs for ratepayers in 2024 from increased PEV charging energy efficiency and lower electricity generation costs.

Environmental & Public Health

Environmental Sustainability

This project could reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 72,500 metric tons per year in 2024 from increased PEV charging efficiency and increased fraction of intermittent operationally GHG-free renewable electricity generation.

Greater Reliability

Reliability

This project is expected to increase reliability of the electric distribution grid and reduce frequency of outages in residential areas. Coordinated charging of PEVs in distribution networks could reduce impacts from sudden surg

Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) represent a rapidly proliferating new vehicle technology and source of utility grid load. Currently only pilot concepts exist for actively managing PEV charge control for the benefit of California's grid and ratepayers. Meanwhile California's electrical grid is evolving to rely more on intermittent renewable power sources, with different "grid acceptance" issues than more traditional generation sources, driven by the state Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), creating a unique opportunity for PEV charging and the "greening of the grid" to go hand-in-hand.

The project developed a one-way charging concept for PEVs that maximized intermittent renewable generation and minimized impacts to the distribution grid. The project focused on controlling the charging of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in residential and small commercial settings using a novel and flexible open-source, open-software architecture charge communication and control platform. This software-based platform was embedded in the context of overall utility and residential and business electrical and building automation systems, lending itself to potential broad implementation by commercial interests due to its flexible architecture and "agnostic" approach to communications standards. Control strategies and applications were guided by an assessment of user needs and grid operation and ratepayer benefits, and the potential for one-way PEV charge control to lead to increased ability to accept intermittent renewable energy for California's electrical grid.

This project was completed in 2019. This project developed and demonstrated electric vehicle charging and building load aggregation and management in response to 15-minute ahead grid condition signals. The research team demonstrated local load optimization to reduce site energy consumption while meeting driver mobility needs, building functionality, and building occupant comfort. Load management strategies such as the one demonstrated in this project can have the potential to save ratepayers $15M per year in 2024 in lowered utility costs (at 1 percent market penetration).[br /]
[br /]
The research team has released the source code on GitHub for public consumption, which has been downloaded about 50 times. About 20 buildings are currently capable of integrating the developed charging communication and control platform. The research team cannot track the number deployments.

This project focuses on controlling the charging of plug-in electric vehicles PEVs at residential and small commercial settings using a novel and flexible open-source, open-architecture charge communication and control platform. This XBOS-V platform is embedded in the context of overall utility and residential and business electrical and building automation systems, lending itself to potential broad implementation by commercial interests. This integrated project also focuses on the development of the open-source platform including assessment of user needs and grid operation and ratepayer benefits, grid security considerations, and the potential for PEV charge control to lead to increased ability to accept intermittent renewable energy for California's electrical grid. The platform is flexible to adoption and inclusion of several communication protocols.

A novel and flexible communication and control for PEVs in residential and small commercial settings.

icon
$1,500,000
$90,000
$1,357,291
url
0

Richmond, CA

Key Learnings

Recommendations for further development of VGI based on findings and learnings from this XBOS-V project include:
• Further development of understanding of potential value streams from various VGI use cases in different settings (residential, workplace, etc.) is important, particularly on a net-value basis where implementation costs are carefully considered along with potential gross revenue value streams.
• Further efforts are needed to better understand what motivates PEV drivers to participate in VGI programs, what functionality and level of control and information they would like, and what concerns would prevent them from participating, especially as the market moves from “early adopters” of PEVs to the “early mainstream;”
• Communications protocols have been the subject of much discussion for VGI with some calling for standardization on a subset of standards, but this seems somewhat premature and unnecessary at this time; flexible frameworks like XBOS-V can operate with various protocols depending on site needs;
• PEVs can clearly offer the potential to help stabilize (or at least avoid further destabilizing) utility grids at the distribution level, and application of the types of algorithms developed in this project should be further investigated for practical application.
• Inter-agency working groups such as the California VGI Working Group are of critical importance to align state agency efforts to help provide consistent signals to the marketplace.

Scalability

This system could be scaled up significantly with the corresponding additional infrastructure and hardware to manage the additional vehicles being charged at additional locations.

Project Owners
Project Users
Displaying 1 - 6 of 1200

Investigate Climate Vulnerability of the Natural Gas System and Identify Resilience Options in the San Diego Area

30776
ICF Incorporated, L.L.C.
0
Closed
PIR-15-004
a:84:{s:9:"ProjectID";s:5:"30776";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"PIR-15-004";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:18:"SolicitationNumber";s:10:"PON-14-507";s:7:"Company";s:24:"ICF Incorporated, L.L.C.";s:12:"ProjectTitle";s:113:"Investigate Climate Vulnerability of the Natural Gas System and Identify Resilience Options in the San Diego Area";s:13:"ProjectAmount";s:11:"456703.0000";s:11:"MatchAmount";s:11:"166200.0000";s:16:"EncumberedAmount";s:11:"456703.0000";s:19:"GrossInvoicedAmount";s:11:"445430.6500";s:15:"LeveragedAmount";s:5:".0000";s:9:"AwardDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:9:"StartDate";s:19:"2016-01-12 00:00:00";s:7:"EndDate";s:19:"2018-05-30 00:00:00";s:13:"ActualEndDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:13:"ProjectStatus";s:6:"Closed";s:14:"InvestmentPlan";N;s:14:"InvestmentArea";s:39:"Energy-Related Environmental Research; ";s:18:"StrategicObjective";s:0:"";s:7:"Program";s:11:"Natural Gas";s:11:"ProgramArea";s:18:"Environmental Area";s:10:"ValueChain";s:12:"Distribution";s:9:"Customers";s:80:"Energy Providers : Natural Gas Utilities~ Empower California : Small Businesses~";s:6:"Topics";s:59:"Environment and Climate Change : Climate Change Adaptation~";s:18:"ProjectDescription";s:834:"The goal of the project is to develop an understanding of climate-related hazard vulnerability and adaptation options in the San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) territory at a level of detail appropriate for informing energy sector policy and planning. The recipient is partnering with SDG&E to conduct a detailed, robust climate change vulnerability assessment and identify and evaluate appropriate adaptation measures. Possible adaptation measures are determined using literature reviews, interviews with key experts, modeling, and workshop elicitation. Potential direct and indirect impacts and adaptation measures are evaluated at an asset-by-asset level, and through system wide assessment. This provides a suite of practical, actionable climate change adaptation measures optimized to SDG&E's natural gas system and customer needs.";s:5:"Issue";s:617:"Energy infrastructure in California's low-lying coastal zones and rugged inland terrain could be adversely impacted by permanent inundation from sea level rise, coastal flooding, or in inland zones vulnerable to landslides, wildfires, and inland flooding. However, detailed information on the threats is often insufficient to inform action, beyond resilience measures that would be undertaken for non-climate reasons. This project improves understanding of vulnerabilities and adaptation measures for natural gas infrastructure within the SDG&E territory so that appropriate policy and planning decisions can be made.";s:13:"ProjectUpdate";N;s:12:"BenefitsDesc";s:475:"SDG&E (a funding partner for this project) will use this research to identify feasible climate adaptation measures that will increase reliability and lower overall costs to the utility and its ratepayers. SDG&E is also sharing the results of this study with the U.S. Department of Energy via its Partnership for Energy Sector Climate Resilience, which is being coordinated with the California Public Utilities Commission/California Energy Commission Adaptation Working Group.";s:15:"SpecBenConsumer";s:0:"";s:12:"SpecBenCosts";s:168:"Cost savings to ratepayers will be realized by avoided costs of damage and service disruptions from climate change impacts, as well as avoided costs from over adapting.";s:15:"SpecBenEconomic";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenEnvironment";s:0:"";s:13:"SpecBenHealth";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenReliability";s:257:"The conclusion from the study will assist SDG&E and other utilities with preparing adaptation plans to climate change, to improve reliability of natural gas service. SDG&E will be able to avoid some service interruption resulting from climate change impacts";s:13:"SpecBenSafety";s:0:"";s:15:"SpecBenSecurity";s:0:"";s:7:"Results";s:0:"";s:18:"HighlightStatement";s:101:"Identifying adaptation measure to reduce vulnerabilities of the natural gas system to climate impacts";s:20:"LeverageContributors";N;s:13:"MatchPartners";s:38:"San Diego Gas & Electric Company; ";s:14:"Subcontractors";s:16:"Revell Coastal; ";s:15:"LocationAddress";s:12:"9300 Lee Hwy";s:12:"LocationCity";s:7:"Fairfax";s:13:"LocationState";s:2:"VA";s:15:"LocationZipCode";s:5:"22031";s:14:"LocationCounty";N;s:30:"LocationCalEnviroDisadvantaged";s:3:"N/A";s:17:"LocationLowIncome";s:3:"N/A";s:22:"LocationNativeAmerican";s:0:"";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:0:"";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:0:"";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:0:"";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:0:"";s:13:"SiteLocations";s:28:"Irvine, CA; San Diego, CA; ";s:12:"SiteCounties";s:20:"Orange; San Diego; ";s:13:"SiteUtilities";s:0:"";s:12:"CECMgrFirstN";s:2:"Yu";s:11:"CECMgrLastN";s:3:"Hou";s:19:"CECMgrNameFormatted";s:7:"Hou, Yu";s:11:"CECMgrPhone";s:12:"916-776-0772";s:11:"CECMgrEmail";s:20:"yu.hou@energy.ca.gov";s:19:"CECMgrPositionTitle";s:32:"Energy Commission Specialist III";s:12:"CECMgrOffice";N;s:20:"CompanyContactFirstN";s:6:"Andrew";s:19:"CompanyContactLastN";s:6:"Petrow";s:19:"CompanyContactEmail";s:22:"Andrew.Petrow@idfi.com";s:19:"CompanyContactTitle";s:0:"";s:9:"CompSmBus";s:3:"N/A";s:12:"CompMicroBus";s:3:"N/A";s:8:"CompDVBE";s:3:"N/A";s:14:"CompWomanOwned";s:2:"No";s:17:"CompMinorityOwned";s:2:"No";s:13:"CompLGBTOwned";s:2:"No";s:19:"IsNoteWorthyProject";s:1:"0";s:17:"FinalReportStatus";s:9:"Completed";s:10:"IsDisabled";s:1:"0";s:10:"Technology";s:0:"";s:9:"Ecosystem";s:0:"";s:29:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaPrime";s:30:"Resiliency, Health, and Safety";s:33:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaSecondary";s:0:"";s:21:"PolicyInnovationGroup";s:0:"";s:16:"FinalReportTitle";s:125:"Potential Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Actions for Gas Assets in the San Diego Gas and Electric Company Service Area";s:19:"FinalReportLinkAddr";s:91:"http://www.climateassessment.ca.gov/techreports/docs/20180827-Energy_CCCA4-CEC-2018-009.pdf";s:5:"sites";a:2:{i:2499;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"2499";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"PIR-15-004";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:5:"17105";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"2";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:0:"";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:8:"Research";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:3:"EUC";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2013-02-07 00:00:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:7:"lkinser";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2018-10-10 15:03:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:8:"jpatters";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:5:"17105";s:11:"AddressType";s:12:"Headquarters";s:7:"Address";s:7:"Various";s:8:"Address2";s:0:"";s:4:"City";s:9:"San Diego";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:5:"92093";s:7:"ZipFive";s:5:"92093";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:2:"39";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:2:"78";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:2:"52";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-117.222343";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"32.885317";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:2:"25";s:6:"County";s:9:"San Diego";s:6:"Region";s:5:"South";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:2:"No";s:9:"LowIncome";s:0:"";}i:2091;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"2091";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"PIR-15-004";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:5:"28169";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"1";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:0:"";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:8:"Research";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:0:"";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2015-05-27 11:20:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:8:"zdextraz";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2018-08-06 09:50:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:4:"yhou";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:5:"28169";s:11:"AddressType";s:12:"Headquarters";s:7:"Address";s:13:"1 Ada Ste 100";s:8:"Address2";s:9:"Suite 100";s:4:"City";s:6:"Irvine";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:9:"926185339";s:7:"ZipFive";s:5:"92618";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:2:"37";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:2:"68";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:2:"45";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-117.734138";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"33.668191";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:2:"31";s:6:"County";s:6:"Orange";s:6:"Region";s:5:"South";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:2:"No";s:9:"LowIncome";s:0:"";}}}

Fairfax, VA

Project Member

Andrew Petrow

Rocket

Revell Coastal

Rocket
Rocket

San Diego Gas &amp

Rocket

Electric Company

Rocket
Lower Costs

Affordability

Cost savings to ratepayers will be realized by avoided costs of damage and service disruptions from climate change impacts, as well as avoided costs from over adapting.

Greater Reliability

Reliability

The conclusion from the study will assist SDG&E and other utilities with preparing adaptation plans to climate change, to improve reliability of natural gas service. SDG&E will be able to avoid some service interruption resulting from climate change impacts

Energy infrastructure in California's low-lying coastal zones and rugged inland terrain could be adversely impacted by permanent inundation from sea level rise, coastal flooding, or in inland zones vulnerable to landslides, wildfires, and inland flooding. However, detailed information on the threats is often insufficient to inform action, beyond resilience measures that would be undertaken for non-climate reasons. This project improves understanding of vulnerabilities and adaptation measures for natural gas infrastructure within the SDG&E territory so that appropriate policy and planning decisions can be made.

The goal of the project is to develop an understanding of climate-related hazard vulnerability and adaptation options in the San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) territory at a level of detail appropriate for informing energy sector policy and planning. The recipient is partnering with SDG&E to conduct a detailed, robust climate change vulnerability assessment and identify and evaluate appropriate adaptation measures. Possible adaptation measures are determined using literature reviews, interviews with key experts, modeling, and workshop elicitation. Potential direct and indirect impacts and adaptation measures are evaluated at an asset-by-asset level, and through system wide assessment. This provides a suite of practical, actionable climate change adaptation measures optimized to SDG&E's natural gas system and customer needs.

By analyzing potential climate change-driven impacts to the San Diego area gas system, the research team generated flexible adaptation pathways to help utilities adapt to climate change hazards while managing uncertainty. The results show many gas assets will potentially experience increased exposure to sea level rise-driven coastal hazards, wildfire, extreme heat, inland flooding, and landslides. Overall, natural gas assets and services are expected to experience limited impacts from the climate hazards investigated in this study. The team developed flexible adaptation pathways. The pathway is created to manage uncertainty by making and adjusting adaptation decisions as new information on climate and non-climate variables becomes available. The project is part of the California 4th climate assessment. The final report will be part of the assessment reports published in late 2018.

SDG&E (a funding partner for this project) will use this research to identify feasible climate adaptation measures that will increase reliability and lower overall costs to the utility and its ratepayers. SDG&E is also sharing the results of this study with the U.S. Department of Energy via its Partnership for Energy Sector Climate Resilience, which is being coordinated with the California Public Utilities Commission/California Energy Commission Adaptation Working Group.

Identifying adaptation measure to reduce vulnerabilities of the natural gas system to climate impacts

icon
$456,703
$166,200
$445,431
0
0

San Diego, CA

Irvine, CA

Project Owners
Project Managers

Assessment of Fugitive Emissions from the Natural Gas System-Commercial Buildings

30779
Institute of Gas Technology dba GTI Energy
1
Ended
PIR-15-003
a:84:{s:9:"ProjectID";s:5:"30779";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"PIR-15-003";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:18:"SolicitationNumber";s:10:"PON-14-507";s:7:"Company";s:42:"Institute of Gas Technology dba GTI Energy";s:12:"ProjectTitle";s:81:"Assessment of Fugitive Emissions from the Natural Gas System-Commercial Buildings";s:13:"ProjectAmount";s:11:"599891.0000";s:11:"MatchAmount";s:5:".0000";s:16:"EncumberedAmount";s:11:"599891.0000";s:19:"GrossInvoicedAmount";s:11:"579829.5600";s:15:"LeveragedAmount";s:5:".0000";s:9:"AwardDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:9:"StartDate";s:19:"2016-01-04 00:00:00";s:7:"EndDate";s:19:"2019-03-29 00:00:00";s:13:"ActualEndDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:13:"ProjectStatus";s:5:"Ended";s:14:"InvestmentPlan";N;s:14:"InvestmentArea";s:39:"Energy-Related Environmental Research; ";s:18:"StrategicObjective";s:0:"";s:7:"Program";s:11:"Natural Gas";s:11:"ProgramArea";s:18:"Environmental Area";s:10:"ValueChain";s:12:"Distribution";s:9:"Customers";s:36:"Commercial Businesses : Restaurants~";s:6:"Topics";s:60:"Environment and Climate Change : Fugitive Methane Emissions~";s:18:"ProjectDescription";s:602:"This project developed and validated a field method to measure after-meter methane leakage from natural gas-fired appliances and gas piping. The researchers took field measurements at 20 commercial food service sites and two inpatient healthcare facilities in California. Using data collected from these buildings, the project team performed a variety of statistical analyses to estimate the magnitude of methane emissions from the food service sector for several scenarios. These scenarios include cities and regions that have different numbers of food service sites with different sizes of operation.";s:5:"Issue";s:380:"California has initiated efforts for quantifying emissions for some sources of emissions, such as natural gas pipelines. However, experts recognize that emissions from other sources, such as commercial buildings, have not been well characterized. This project is essential to providing the necessary information to measure and quantify methane emissions from commercial buildings.";s:13:"ProjectUpdate";N;s:12:"BenefitsDesc";s:414:"This project collected methane emission data from California's commercial building sector. This is the first time emissions from this sector have been systematically studied. The findings from this study were shared with the California Air Resources Board to improve estimations of methane emissions from buildings, which are essential to ensure that the State develops well-informed emission reduction strategies.";s:15:"SpecBenConsumer";s:0:"";s:12:"SpecBenCosts";s:0:"";s:15:"SpecBenEconomic";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenEnvironment";s:391:"The project results assist in quantification of after-the-meter methane leakages from commercial sectors. This information will help California's efforts to reduce greenhouse gases by informing the greenhouse gas inventory calculation managed by the California Air Resource Board. This project began the process of better estimating the impact of these sectors on total statewide emissions. ";s:13:"SpecBenHealth";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenReliability";s:0:"";s:13:"SpecBenSafety";s:0:"";s:15:"SpecBenSecurity";s:0:"";s:7:"Results";s:0:"";s:18:"HighlightStatement";s:145:"Developing a field method to plan, conduct, and analyze measurements of fugitive methane leaks/emissions from commercial buildings in California.";s:20:"LeverageContributors";N;s:13:"MatchPartners";s:0:"";s:14:"Subcontractors";s:39:"Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; ";s:15:"LocationAddress";s:24:"1700 S Mount Prospect Rd";s:12:"LocationCity";s:11:"Des Plaines";s:13:"LocationState";s:2:"IL";s:15:"LocationZipCode";s:5:"60018";s:14:"LocationCounty";N;s:30:"LocationCalEnviroDisadvantaged";s:2:"No";s:17:"LocationLowIncome";s:2:"No";s:22:"LocationNativeAmerican";s:3:"N/A";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:0:"";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:0:"";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:0:"";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:0:"";s:13:"SiteLocations";s:25:"Davis, CA; Various, CA; ";s:12:"SiteCounties";s:15:"Solano; Yolo; ";s:13:"SiteUtilities";s:0:"";s:12:"CECMgrFirstN";s:2:"Yu";s:11:"CECMgrLastN";s:3:"Hou";s:19:"CECMgrNameFormatted";s:7:"Hou, Yu";s:11:"CECMgrPhone";s:12:"916-776-0772";s:11:"CECMgrEmail";s:20:"yu.hou@energy.ca.gov";s:19:"CECMgrPositionTitle";s:32:"Energy Commission Specialist III";s:12:"CECMgrOffice";N;s:20:"CompanyContactFirstN";s:5:"Larry";s:19:"CompanyContactLastN";s:5:"Brand";s:19:"CompanyContactEmail";s:29:"Larry.Brand@Gastechnology.org";s:19:"CompanyContactTitle";s:12:"R&D Director";s:9:"CompSmBus";s:3:"N/A";s:12:"CompMicroBus";s:3:"N/A";s:8:"CompDVBE";s:3:"N/A";s:14:"CompWomanOwned";s:2:"No";s:17:"CompMinorityOwned";s:2:"No";s:13:"CompLGBTOwned";s:2:"No";s:19:"IsNoteWorthyProject";s:1:"0";s:17:"FinalReportStatus";s:9:"Completed";s:10:"IsDisabled";s:1:"0";s:10:"Technology";s:0:"";s:9:"Ecosystem";s:0:"";s:29:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaPrime";s:26:"Gas System Decarbonization";s:33:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaSecondary";s:0:"";s:21:"PolicyInnovationGroup";s:0:"";s:16:"FinalReportTitle";s:85:"Assessment of Fugitive Emissions from the Natural Gas System – Commercial Buildings";s:19:"FinalReportLinkAddr";s:80:"https://ww2.energy.ca.gov/2020publications/CEC-500-2020-035/CEC-500-2020-035.pdf";s:5:"sites";a:2:{i:2498;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"2498";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"PIR-15-003";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:4:"3683";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"2";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:0:"";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:8:"Research";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:0:"";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2010-03-24 15:01:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:7:"gkibrya";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2022-01-14 14:13:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:8:"Jrosales";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:4:"3683";s:11:"AddressType";s:12:"Headquarters";s:7:"Address";s:31:"Various locations in California";s:8:"Address2";s:0:"";s:4:"City";s:7:"Various";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:9:"999999999";s:7:"ZipFive";s:5:"99999";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:1:"0";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:1:"0";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:1:"0";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:0:"";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:0:"";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:1:"0";s:6:"County";s:12:"Out Of State";s:6:"Region";s:0:"";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:2:"No";s:9:"LowIncome";s:2:"No";}i:2092;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"2092";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"PIR-15-003";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:5:"28630";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"1";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:0:"";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:8:"Research";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:0:"";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2015-12-02 11:48:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:8:"zdextraz";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2020-12-14 16:04:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:6:"ajacob";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:5:"28630";s:11:"AddressType";s:15:"Mailing Address";s:7:"Address";s:8:"412 F St";s:8:"Address2";s:0:"";s:4:"City";s:5:"Davis";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:9:"956164112";s:7:"ZipFive";N;s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:1:"3";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:1:"4";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:1:"3";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-121.740707";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"38.546244";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:2:"35";s:6:"County";s:4:"Yolo";s:6:"Region";s:5:"North";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:2:"No";s:9:"LowIncome";s:3:"Yes";}}}
Tech Partner
Tech Partner 2

Des Plaines, IL

37th
68th
POINT (-117.752038 33.669764)
Project Member

Larry Brand

R&D Director
Rocket

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Rocket
Environmental & Public Health

Environmental Sustainability

The project results assist in quantification of after-the-meter methane leakages from commercial sectors. This information will help California's efforts to reduce greenhouse gases by informing the greenhouse gas inventory calculation managed by the California Air Resource Board. This project began the process of better estimating the impact of these sectors on total statewide emissions.

California has initiated efforts for quantifying emissions for some sources of emissions, such as natural gas pipelines. However, experts recognize that emissions from other sources, such as commercial buildings, have not been well characterized. This project is essential to providing the necessary information to measure and quantify methane emissions from commercial buildings.

This project developed and validated a field method to measure after-meter methane leakage from natural gas-fired appliances and gas piping. The researchers took field measurements at 20 commercial food service sites and two inpatient healthcare facilities in California. Using data collected from these buildings, the project team performed a variety of statistical analyses to estimate the magnitude of methane emissions from the food service sector for several scenarios. These scenarios include cities and regions that have different numbers of food service sites with different sizes of operation.

The project is completed. The researchers developed measurement techniques for fugitive emissions from piping components and combustion equipment and validated them in the field for most of the commercial equipment encountered. The majority of those fugitive emissions came from a relatively small number of appliance and piping component types. This suggests it may be possible to significantly reduce fugitive emissions from the commercial food service sector by identifying and repairing a relatively small number of problem areas. The results are shared with the California Air Resource Board (CARB). CARB is considering using the results from this study and other Energy Commission funded methane emission studies to improve its GHG inventory.

This project collected methane emission data from California's commercial building sector. This is the first time emissions from this sector have been systematically studied. The findings from this study were shared with the California Air Resources Board to improve estimations of methane emissions from buildings, which are essential to ensure that the State develops well-informed emission reduction strategies.

Developing a field method to plan, conduct, and analyze measurements of fugitive methane leaks/emissions from commercial buildings in California.

icon
$599,891
$0
$579,830
0
0

Various, CA

Davis, CA

Project Owners
Project Managers
Project Users

Open Source Platform For Plug-in Electric Vehicle Smart Charging in California

30804
The Regents of the University of California on behalf of the Berkeley campus
0
Closed
EPC-15-013
a:84:{s:9:"ProjectID";s:5:"30804";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"EPC-15-013";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:18:"SolicitationNumber";s:10:"PON-14-310";s:7:"Company";s:76:"The Regents of the University of California on behalf of the Berkeley campus";s:12:"ProjectTitle";s:78:"Open Source Platform For Plug-in Electric Vehicle Smart Charging in California";s:13:"ProjectAmount";s:12:"1500000.0000";s:11:"MatchAmount";s:10:"90000.0000";s:16:"EncumberedAmount";s:12:"1500000.0000";s:19:"GrossInvoicedAmount";s:12:"1357290.9800";s:15:"LeveragedAmount";s:5:".0000";s:9:"AwardDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:9:"StartDate";s:19:"2016-02-01 00:00:00";s:7:"EndDate";s:19:"2019-01-31 00:00:00";s:13:"ActualEndDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:13:"ProjectStatus";s:6:"Closed";s:14:"InvestmentPlan";s:2:"10";s:14:"InvestmentArea";s:2:"10";s:18:"StrategicObjective";s:0:"";s:7:"Program";s:4:"EPIC";s:11:"ProgramArea";s:14:"Transportation";s:10:"ValueChain";s:22:"Demand-side Management";s:9:"Customers";s:64:"Energy Providers : Electric Utilities and Balancing Authorities~";s:6:"Topics";s:302:"Demand Response : Communication and Standards~ Demand Response : Energy Management Systems~ Demand Response : Renewable Integration~ Public Health and Safety : Ambient Air Pollution~ Smart Grid : Vehicle-Grid Integration~ Storage : Plug-in Electric Vehicles~ Transportation : Plug-in Electric Vehicles~";s:18:"ProjectDescription";s:975:"The project developed a one-way charging concept for PEVs that maximized intermittent renewable generation and minimized impacts to the distribution grid. The project focused on controlling the charging of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in residential and small commercial settings using a novel and flexible open-source, open-software architecture charge communication and control platform. This software-based platform was embedded in the context of overall utility and residential and business electrical and building automation systems, lending itself to potential broad implementation by commercial interests due to its flexible architecture and "agnostic" approach to communications standards. Control strategies and applications were guided by an assessment of user needs and grid operation and ratepayer benefits, and the potential for one-way PEV charge control to lead to increased ability to accept intermittent renewable energy for California's electrical grid.";s:5:"Issue";s:594:"Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) represent a rapidly proliferating new vehicle technology and source of utility grid load. Currently only pilot concepts exist for actively managing PEV charge control for the benefit of California's grid and ratepayers. Meanwhile California's electrical grid is evolving to rely more on intermittent renewable power sources, with different "grid acceptance" issues than more traditional generation sources, driven by the state Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), creating a unique opportunity for PEV charging and the "greening of the grid" to go hand-in-hand. ";s:13:"ProjectUpdate";N;s:12:"BenefitsDesc";s:865:"This project focuses on controlling the charging of plug-in electric vehicles PEVs at residential and small commercial settings using a novel and flexible open-source, open-architecture charge communication and control platform. This XBOS-V platform is embedded in the context of overall utility and residential and business electrical and building automation systems, lending itself to potential broad implementation by commercial interests. This integrated project also focuses on the development of the open-source platform including assessment of user needs and grid operation and ratepayer benefits, grid security considerations, and the potential for PEV charge control to lead to increased ability to accept intermittent renewable energy for California's electrical grid. The platform is flexible to adoption and inclusion of several communication protocols.";s:15:"SpecBenConsumer";s:0:"";s:12:"SpecBenCosts";s:199:"This project is estimated to result in $15 million per year reduction in electricity costs for ratepayers in 2024 from increased PEV charging energy efficiency and lower electricity generation costs.";s:15:"SpecBenEconomic";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenEnvironment";s:224:"This project could reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 72,500 metric tons per year in 2024 from increased PEV charging efficiency and increased fraction of intermittent operationally GHG-free renewable electricity generation.";s:13:"SpecBenHealth";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenReliability";s:675:"This project is expected to increase reliability of the electric distribution grid and reduce frequency of outages in residential areas. Coordinated charging of PEVs in distribution networks could reduce impacts from sudden surges in charging (e.g., PEV owners in large groups set the timing of the charge to coincide with reductions in TOU rates after the evening peak). By coordinating the charge more carefully across utility distribution level nodes, these grid impacts can be greatly minimized based on initial project findings. Managed charging also has the potential to mitigate 500 GWh and 2 TWh of renewable overgeneration curtailment in 2024 and 2030, respectively";s:13:"SpecBenSafety";s:0:"";s:15:"SpecBenSecurity";s:0:"";s:7:"Results";s:0:"";s:18:"HighlightStatement";s:101:"A novel and flexible communication and control for PEVs in residential and small commercial settings.";s:20:"LeverageContributors";N;s:13:"MatchPartners";s:22:"BMW of North America; ";s:14:"Subcontractors";s:22:"BMW of North America; ";s:15:"LocationAddress";s:50:"760 Davis Hall, University Of California, Berkeley";s:12:"LocationCity";s:8:"Berkeley";s:13:"LocationState";s:2:"CA";s:15:"LocationZipCode";s:5:"94720";s:14:"LocationCounty";s:7:"Alameda";s:30:"LocationCalEnviroDisadvantaged";s:2:"No";s:17:"LocationLowIncome";s:2:"No";s:22:"LocationNativeAmerican";s:2:"No";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-122.254943";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"37.873831";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:1:"7";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:2:"14";s:13:"SiteLocations";s:14:"Richmond, CA; ";s:12:"SiteCounties";s:14:"Contra Costa; ";s:13:"SiteUtilities";s:0:"";s:12:"CECMgrFirstN";s:7:"Matthew";s:11:"CECMgrLastN";s:4:"Fung";s:19:"CECMgrNameFormatted";s:13:"Fung, Matthew";s:11:"CECMgrPhone";s:12:"916-776-0757";s:11:"CECMgrEmail";s:19:"mfung@Energy.ca.gov";s:19:"CECMgrPositionTitle";s:19:"Mechanical Engineer";s:12:"CECMgrOffice";N;s:20:"CompanyContactFirstN";s:7:"Timothy";s:19:"CompanyContactLastN";s:6:"Lipman";s:19:"CompanyContactEmail";s:21:"telipman@berkeley.edu";s:19:"CompanyContactTitle";s:22:"Principal Invistigator";s:9:"CompSmBus";s:3:"N/A";s:12:"CompMicroBus";s:3:"N/A";s:8:"CompDVBE";s:3:"N/A";s:14:"CompWomanOwned";s:2:"No";s:17:"CompMinorityOwned";s:2:"No";s:13:"CompLGBTOwned";s:2:"No";s:19:"IsNoteWorthyProject";s:1:"0";s:17:"FinalReportStatus";s:9:"Completed";s:10:"IsDisabled";s:1:"0";s:10:"Technology";s:50:"Vehicle-to-Grid Integration~ Virtual Power Plants~";s:9:"Ecosystem";s:14:"Not Applicable";s:29:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaPrime";s:25:"Low Carbon Transportation";s:33:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaSecondary";s:41:"Grid Decarbonization and Decentralization";s:21:"PolicyInnovationGroup";s:0:"";s:16:"FinalReportTitle";s:106:"Open Source, Open Architecture Software Platform for Plug-In Electric Vehicle Smart Charging in California";s:19:"FinalReportLinkAddr";s:87:"https://ww2.energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport_cms.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2020-005";s:5:"sites";a:1:{i:1908;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"1908";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"EPC-15-013";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:5:"28607";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"1";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:22:"Richmond Field Station";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:8:"Research";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:0:"";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2015-12-01 11:28:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:8:"rgonzale";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2021-01-06 11:35:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:5:"mfung";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:5:"28607";s:11:"AddressType";s:12:"Headquarters";s:7:"Address";s:14:"1301 S 46Th St";s:8:"Address2";s:0:"";s:4:"City";s:8:"Richmond";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:9:"948044600";s:7:"ZipFive";N;s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:1:"9";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:2:"15";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:2:"11";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-122.331938";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"37.915363";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:1:"3";s:6:"County";s:12:"Contra Costa";s:6:"Region";s:5:"North";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:3:"Yes";s:9:"LowIncome";s:2:"No";}}}
-122.254943
37.873831

Berkeley, CA

7th
14th
POINT (-122.254943 37.873831)
Project Member

Timothy Lipman

Principal Invistigator
Rocket

BMW of North America

Rocket
Rocket

BMW of North America

Rocket
Lower Costs

Affordability

This project is estimated to result in $15 million per year reduction in electricity costs for ratepayers in 2024 from increased PEV charging energy efficiency and lower electricity generation costs.

Environmental & Public Health

Environmental Sustainability

This project could reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 72,500 metric tons per year in 2024 from increased PEV charging efficiency and increased fraction of intermittent operationally GHG-free renewable electricity generation.

Greater Reliability

Reliability

This project is expected to increase reliability of the electric distribution grid and reduce frequency of outages in residential areas. Coordinated charging of PEVs in distribution networks could reduce impacts from sudden surg

Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) represent a rapidly proliferating new vehicle technology and source of utility grid load. Currently only pilot concepts exist for actively managing PEV charge control for the benefit of California's grid and ratepayers. Meanwhile California's electrical grid is evolving to rely more on intermittent renewable power sources, with different "grid acceptance" issues than more traditional generation sources, driven by the state Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), creating a unique opportunity for PEV charging and the "greening of the grid" to go hand-in-hand.

The project developed a one-way charging concept for PEVs that maximized intermittent renewable generation and minimized impacts to the distribution grid. The project focused on controlling the charging of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in residential and small commercial settings using a novel and flexible open-source, open-software architecture charge communication and control platform. This software-based platform was embedded in the context of overall utility and residential and business electrical and building automation systems, lending itself to potential broad implementation by commercial interests due to its flexible architecture and "agnostic" approach to communications standards. Control strategies and applications were guided by an assessment of user needs and grid operation and ratepayer benefits, and the potential for one-way PEV charge control to lead to increased ability to accept intermittent renewable energy for California's electrical grid.

This project was completed in 2019. This project developed and demonstrated electric vehicle charging and building load aggregation and management in response to 15-minute ahead grid condition signals. The research team demonstrated local load optimization to reduce site energy consumption while meeting driver mobility needs, building functionality, and building occupant comfort. Load management strategies such as the one demonstrated in this project can have the potential to save ratepayers $15M per year in 2024 in lowered utility costs (at 1 percent market penetration).[br /]
[br /]
The research team has released the source code on GitHub for public consumption, which has been downloaded about 50 times. About 20 buildings are currently capable of integrating the developed charging communication and control platform. The research team cannot track the number deployments.

This project focuses on controlling the charging of plug-in electric vehicles PEVs at residential and small commercial settings using a novel and flexible open-source, open-architecture charge communication and control platform. This XBOS-V platform is embedded in the context of overall utility and residential and business electrical and building automation systems, lending itself to potential broad implementation by commercial interests. This integrated project also focuses on the development of the open-source platform including assessment of user needs and grid operation and ratepayer benefits, grid security considerations, and the potential for PEV charge control to lead to increased ability to accept intermittent renewable energy for California's electrical grid. The platform is flexible to adoption and inclusion of several communication protocols.

A novel and flexible communication and control for PEVs in residential and small commercial settings.

icon
$1,500,000
$90,000
$1,357,291
url
0

Richmond, CA

Key Learnings

Recommendations for further development of VGI based on findings and learnings from this XBOS-V project include:
• Further development of understanding of potential value streams from various VGI use cases in different settings (residential, workplace, etc.) is important, particularly on a net-value basis where implementation costs are carefully considered along with potential gross revenue value streams.
• Further efforts are needed to better understand what motivates PEV drivers to participate in VGI programs, what functionality and level of control and information they would like, and what concerns would prevent them from participating, especially as the market moves from “early adopters” of PEVs to the “early mainstream;”
• Communications protocols have been the subject of much discussion for VGI with some calling for standardization on a subset of standards, but this seems somewhat premature and unnecessary at this time; flexible frameworks like XBOS-V can operate with various protocols depending on site needs;
• PEVs can clearly offer the potential to help stabilize (or at least avoid further destabilizing) utility grids at the distribution level, and application of the types of algorithms developed in this project should be further investigated for practical application.
• Inter-agency working groups such as the California VGI Working Group are of critical importance to align state agency efforts to help provide consistent signals to the marketplace.

Scalability

This system could be scaled up significantly with the corresponding additional infrastructure and hardware to manage the additional vehicles being charged at additional locations.

Project Owners
Project Users

Grid Communication Interface for Smart Electric Vehicle Services Research and Development

30808
Andromeda Power, LLC
0
Closed
EPC-15-015
a:84:{s:9:"ProjectID";s:5:"30808";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"EPC-15-015";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:18:"SolicitationNumber";s:10:"PON-14-310";s:7:"Company";s:20:"Andromeda Power, LLC";s:12:"ProjectTitle";s:89:"Grid Communication Interface for Smart Electric Vehicle Services Research and Development";s:13:"ProjectAmount";s:11:"681693.0000";s:11:"MatchAmount";s:11:"465000.0000";s:16:"EncumberedAmount";s:11:"681693.0000";s:19:"GrossInvoicedAmount";s:11:"681683.3800";s:15:"LeveragedAmount";s:5:".0000";s:9:"AwardDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:9:"StartDate";s:19:"2016-02-01 00:00:00";s:7:"EndDate";s:19:"2019-01-30 00:00:00";s:13:"ActualEndDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:13:"ProjectStatus";s:6:"Closed";s:14:"InvestmentPlan";s:2:"10";s:14:"InvestmentArea";s:2:"10";s:18:"StrategicObjective";s:0:"";s:7:"Program";s:4:"EPIC";s:11:"ProgramArea";s:14:"Transportation";s:10:"ValueChain";s:22:"Demand-side Management";s:9:"Customers";s:64:"Energy Providers : Electric Utilities and Balancing Authorities~";s:6:"Topics";s:240:"Demand Response : Automated Demand Response~ Public Health and Safety : System Resiliency~ Smart Grid : Battery Storage~ Smart Grid : Vehicle-Grid Integration~ Storage : Plug-in Electric Vehicles~ Transportation : Plug-in Electric Vehicles~";s:18:"ProjectDescription";s:622:"Andromeda Power developed an advanced smart grid communication interface that allows utilities to send dispatch signals to PEVs in real-time to optimize the bidirectional power flow of PEV battery packs depending on local power conditions such as congestion, power quality, voltage and frequency, while maintaining the driver's mobility needs. The grid communication interface operates with a virtual machine that is able to interface with PEVs of any standard. The real-time monitoring and control of the stations provided the California electric investor-owned utilities with a means of quick, automated demand response.";s:5:"Issue";s:650:"The increase of distributed energy resources, including intermittent renewables and storage in plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), makes the coordination of supply and demand to maintain the reliability of the distribution network challenging. PEVs are rapidly expanding in [!--t1:place w:st="o--][st1:State w:st="on"]California[/st1:State] and this will proportionally increase the installation of bidirectional charging stations, creating additional demand and potential stress on the grid. In order to effectively implement vehicle-to-grid (V2G) services, the grid has to be capable of effective machine-to-machine and user-to-machine communication.";s:13:"ProjectUpdate";N;s:12:"BenefitsDesc";s:800:"This project enables the harmonization of V2G services, removing the communication barrier between PEVs of different standards and the grid. The communication interface enables Smart Demand Side Management benefits to the ratepayer with the possibility of using PEVs as distributed energy storage and controllable load. Local PEVs can mitigate the renewable over-generation and intermittency by storing renewable energy and delivering it to the grid on demand, potentially saving $1,861 per year for each PEV. The additional smart charging incentive can accelerate PEV adoption to achieve the targeted 1.5 million ZEVs on the road by 2025 and 5 million by 2030. Using PEVs as an energy storage resource can reduce energy demand and stress of the grid, making the load predictable and more manageable.";s:15:"SpecBenConsumer";s:0:"";s:12:"SpecBenCosts";s:231:"The annual energy shift capacity introduced by InCISIVE is about 11 MWh/year (= 30 kWh x 365) toward the end of On-Peak period and in the following Mid-Peak period when marginal electricity is produced by natural gas peaker plants.";s:15:"SpecBenEconomic";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenEnvironment";s:369:"Each PEV (30 kWh storage) optimally used for energy storage that charges and discharges once per day is estimated to result in approximately 7 metric tons per year of GHG reductions through the offsetting of natural gas peaker plants. Additional GHG reduction can be achieved using PEV batteries to store excess renewable energy to flatten the electric grid duck curve.";s:13:"SpecBenHealth";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenReliability";s:0:"";s:13:"SpecBenSafety";s:0:"";s:15:"SpecBenSecurity";s:0:"";s:7:"Results";s:0:"";s:18:"HighlightStatement";s:93:"Advancing current and future grid services for PEV through V2G communications and OpenADR 2.0";s:20:"LeverageContributors";N;s:13:"MatchPartners";s:20:"Suncharge; Verdek; ";s:14:"Subcontractors";s:0:"";s:15:"LocationAddress";s:17:"2500 Mira Mar Ave";s:12:"LocationCity";s:10:"Long Beach";s:13:"LocationState";s:2:"CA";s:15:"LocationZipCode";s:5:"90815";s:14:"LocationCounty";s:11:"Los Angeles";s:30:"LocationCalEnviroDisadvantaged";s:2:"No";s:17:"LocationLowIncome";s:3:"Yes";s:22:"LocationNativeAmerican";s:2:"No";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-118.146367";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"33.801628";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:2:"33";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:2:"70";s:13:"SiteLocations";s:16:"Costa Mesa, CA; ";s:12:"SiteCounties";s:8:"Orange; ";s:13:"SiteUtilities";s:0:"";s:12:"CECMgrFirstN";s:7:"Matthew";s:11:"CECMgrLastN";s:4:"Fung";s:19:"CECMgrNameFormatted";s:13:"Fung, Matthew";s:11:"CECMgrPhone";s:12:"916-776-0757";s:11:"CECMgrEmail";s:19:"mfung@Energy.ca.gov";s:19:"CECMgrPositionTitle";s:19:"Mechanical Engineer";s:12:"CECMgrOffice";N;s:20:"CompanyContactFirstN";s:7:"Heather";s:19:"CompanyContactLastN";s:3:"Lin";s:19:"CompanyContactEmail";s:26:"heather@andromedapower.com";s:19:"CompanyContactTitle";s:0:"";s:9:"CompSmBus";s:3:"N/A";s:12:"CompMicroBus";s:3:"N/A";s:8:"CompDVBE";s:3:"N/A";s:14:"CompWomanOwned";s:2:"No";s:17:"CompMinorityOwned";s:2:"No";s:13:"CompLGBTOwned";s:2:"No";s:19:"IsNoteWorthyProject";s:1:"0";s:17:"FinalReportStatus";s:9:"Completed";s:10:"IsDisabled";s:1:"0";s:10:"Technology";s:50:"Vehicle-to-Grid Integration~ Virtual Power Plants~";s:9:"Ecosystem";s:14:"Not Applicable";s:29:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaPrime";s:25:"Low Carbon Transportation";s:33:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaSecondary";s:41:"Grid Decarbonization and Decentralization";s:21:"PolicyInnovationGroup";s:0:"";s:16:"FinalReportTitle";s:65:"Grid Communication Interface for Smart Electric Vehicle Services ";s:19:"FinalReportLinkAddr";s:80:"https://ww2.energy.ca.gov/2020publications/CEC-500-2020-028/CEC-500-2020-028.pdf";s:5:"sites";a:1:{i:1853;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"1853";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"EPC-15-015";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:5:"28451";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"1";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:0:"";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:8:"Research";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:0:"";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2015-10-07 13:32:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:8:"rgonzale";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2019-01-09 11:46:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:5:"mfung";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:5:"28451";s:11:"AddressType";s:12:"Headquarters";s:7:"Address";s:13:"711 W 17Th St";s:8:"Address2";s:0:"";s:4:"City";s:10:"Costa Mesa";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:9:"926274350";s:7:"ZipFive";N;s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:2:"37";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:2:"74";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:2:"48";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-117.928204";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"33.636076";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:2:"31";s:6:"County";s:6:"Orange";s:6:"Region";s:5:"South";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:3:"Yes";s:9:"LowIncome";s:0:"";}}}
-118.146367
33.801628

Long Beach, CA

33rd
70th
POINT (-118.146367 33.801628)
Luigi	Giubbolini

Luigi Giubbolini

Research and Development Director
Guy Mannino

Guy Mannino

Research and Innovation Director
Verdek, LLC
Rocket

Suncharge

Rocket

Verdek

Rocket
Prove the feasibility of a comprehensive VGI communication interface developing V1G and V2G networked EVSE prototypes.
Identify challenges and provide recommendations to accelerate deployment of VGI technology.
Identify unmet technology needs/gaps and potential solutions.
Lower Costs

Affordability

The annual energy shift capacity introduced by InCISIVE is about 11 MWh/year (= 30 kWh x 365) toward the end of On-Peak period and in the following Mid-Peak period when marginal electricity is produced by natural gas peaker plant

Environmental & Public Health

Environmental Sustainability

Each PEV (30 kWh storage) optimally used for energy storage that charges and discharges once per day is estimated to result in approximately 7 metric tons per year of GHG reductions through the offsetting of natural gas peaker pl

The increase of distributed energy resources, including intermittent renewables and storage in plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), makes the coordination of supply and demand to maintain the reliability of the distribution network challenging. PEVs are rapidly expanding in [!--t1:place w:st="o--][st1:State w:st="on"]California[/st1:State] and this will proportionally increase the installation of bidirectional charging stations, creating additional demand and potential stress on the grid. In order to effectively implement vehicle-to-grid (V2G) services, the grid has to be capable of effective machine-to-machine and user-to-machine communication.

Andromeda Power developed an advanced smart grid communication interface that allows utilities to send dispatch signals to PEVs in real-time to optimize the bidirectional power flow of PEV battery packs depending on local power conditions such as congestion, power quality, voltage and frequency, while maintaining the driver's mobility needs. The grid communication interface operates with a virtual machine that is able to interface with PEVs of any standard. The real-time monitoring and control of the stations provided the California electric investor-owned utilities with a means of quick, automated demand response.

This project was completed in 2019. The project team designed and prototyped two models of Level 2 chargers capable of demand response according to the V1G (managed charging) use cases defined by SCE and PG&E. The project team conducted fast charge and discharge simulation of the PEVs using OpenADR signals and collected performance data. The EVSEs (Level 2 and Level 3) were integrated in a microgrid with 110 kW solar panels to demonstrate the feasibility of the InCISIVE system in mitigating renewable energy overgeneration. Using low-priced renewable energy stored in PEVs instead of energy from natural gas peakers results in energy savings of 21.9 MWh and about a $3,700 savings per PEV per year for California ratepayers.

This project enables the harmonization of V2G services, removing the communication barrier between PEVs of different standards and the grid. The communication interface enables Smart Demand Side Management benefits to the ratepayer with the possibility of using PEVs as distributed energy storage and controllable load. Local PEVs can mitigate the renewable over-generation and intermittency by storing renewable energy and delivering it to the grid on demand, potentially saving $1,861 per year for each PEV. The additional smart charging incentive can accelerate PEV adoption to achieve the targeted 1.5 million ZEVs on the road by 2025 and 5 million by 2030. Using PEVs as an energy storage resource can reduce energy demand and stress of the grid, making the load predictable and more manageable. [br /]

Advancing current and future grid services for PEV through V2G communications and OpenADR 2.0

icon
$681,693
$465,000
$681,683
url
0

Costa Mesa, CA

Key Learnings

The major lesson learned from this project is that a V2G distributed energy resource system dealing with solar generation and PEV charging and discharging would effectively enable distributed electricity generation and storage. Such a system would benefit the grid and microgrids. A microgrid is a local group of electricity loads and sources that normally operate as part of the electric grid, but can be disconnected and operate autonomously when conditions dictate it is better to do so. However, additional research and development is needed to develop an electricity management system capable of integrating PEVs with distributed energy resources, complying with Rule 21. This additional research would lead to establishing a new family of V2G distributed energy resource capable products to interconnect with solar panels, smart inverters, PEVs, the local microgrid, and the grid as a whole.

A key lesson learned from this project is that a V2G-DER system that deals with solar generation and PEV charging and discharging would enable distributed generation and storage. Such a V2G-DER system would benefit the grid and the microgrid. To this end, additional R&D is still necessary to finalize the development of an energy management system capable of integrating PEVs with distributed resources and controlled by Rule 21 to participate in DER programs. This additional research would lead to establishing a new family of products, V2G-DER capable, of interconnecting solar panels, smart inverters, and PEVs with the local microgrid and with the grid.

Recommendations to Solve and Avoid Inconsistencies Within and Across Vehicle-Grid Integration Protocols
• Rule 21 Coordinated Charge/Discharge Management Function can be used for V2G. However, its Ramp Time (in seconds), should not be controlled by this Rule 21 Function because Ramp Time is already controlled (limited) by the EVSE and the onboard battery management system of the PEV to preserve the battery lifetime (as specified by ISO/IEC 15118-2 and CHAdeMO standards).
• ISO/IEC 15118-2 edition 2 (not available yet). To implement V2G cases with CCS PEVs, the standard should:
o Include dynamic charging and discharging (similar to CHAdeMO 2.0, V2X).
o Defer the ramp time control to the EVSE and not to the PEV (as in the current standard edition). EVSE must be free to modify current direction and intensity in real time in order to accommodate the instantaneous changes in solar and wind power, as well as DR signals. Without this provision it will not be possible to implement DR with quick response time (seconds instead of minutes).
• OCPP 2.0 formalizes new OCPP messages to deliver DR signals and events from the central station (cloud) to the smart inverter embedded into the charge point (EVSE). OCPP 2.0 message set should include the transport of SEP 2.0b (IEEE 2030.5) messages. This inclusion would enable smart inverters to be used within charging stations for
V2G use cases and be managed by OCPP 2.0 according to SIWG recommendations. This recommendation was sent to OCA in March 2017.
• OpenADR: VEN interoperability between different electric utilities. Different electric utilities can implement similar plans and programs using different OpenADR events/messages and signal levels. It is essential that the OpenADR Alliance provide a set of “reference events” applicable for the basic electric utility programs, i.e. V1G Power Curtailment, etc.
• OpenADR Alliance defines a new PEV-DER Program for a V2G-DER Use Case, bidirectional EVSE with solar panels and smart inverter. Currently, the standard requires the use of two programs: PEV and DER. The use of two programs could lead to inconsistency of operation. A new OpenADR PEV-DER program for bidirectional electricity resources is recommended (that would be applicable to EVSE-PEV-PV as electricity generation and storage).

Scalability

In response to market demands, the company’s team is developing a low-cost second generation of the V1G InCISIVE L2 products to meet market requirements and an extended set of features:
• Energy Star
• Retractable cable and multiple chargers mounted on the same pole (up to four)
• LED display 7""""
• RF/ID for payment and authorization, IoT 4G/LTE+ gateway

Project Owners
Project Users

Low Cost, Large Diameter, Shallow Ground Loops for Ground-Coupled Heat Pumps

30809
Regents of the University of California, Davis
0
Closed
EPC-15-019
a:84:{s:9:"ProjectID";s:5:"30809";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"EPC-15-019";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:18:"SolicitationNumber";s:10:"PON-13-301";s:7:"Company";s:46:"Regents of the University of California, Davis";s:12:"ProjectTitle";s:76:"Low Cost, Large Diameter, Shallow Ground Loops for Ground-Coupled Heat Pumps";s:13:"ProjectAmount";s:12:"1212186.0000";s:11:"MatchAmount";s:10:"18826.0000";s:16:"EncumberedAmount";s:12:"1212186.0000";s:19:"GrossInvoicedAmount";s:12:"1137234.4600";s:15:"LeveragedAmount";s:5:".0000";s:9:"AwardDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:9:"StartDate";s:19:"2016-06-01 00:00:00";s:7:"EndDate";s:19:"2020-03-31 00:00:00";s:13:"ActualEndDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:13:"ProjectStatus";s:6:"Closed";s:14:"InvestmentPlan";s:2:"10";s:14:"InvestmentArea";s:2:"10";s:18:"StrategicObjective";s:0:"";s:7:"Program";s:4:"EPIC";s:11:"ProgramArea";s:35:"Buildings End-Use Energy Efficiency";s:10:"ValueChain";s:22:"Demand-side Management";s:9:"Customers";s:304:"Home and Communities : Existing Homes~ Home and Communities : Multi-family Homes~ Home and Communities : New Homes and Residential Developments~ Home and Communities : Rural and Farm Communities~ Empower California : Small Businesses~ Empower California : DVBE, LGBT, Minority, or Women Owned Businesses~";s:6:"Topics";s:156:"Energy Efficiency : Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning~ Energy Efficiency : Zero Net Energy Buildings~ Public Health and Safety : Indoor Air Quality~";s:18:"ProjectDescription";s:1151:"This project is researching shallow (20-30 feet deep) and large diameter (2-3 feet diameter) helical coil, ground heat exchanger designs for ground source heat pumps. This project seeks to fill the current informational void with the materials and tools needed to eliminate the risks involved with engineering this new technology into homes. To this end, the project analyzed the performance of different designs of large diameter shallow bore GHEs, produced a calibrated model that can predict the performance of these GHEs and incorporate them into industry-standard design tools, and produced the materials that the industry needs to confidently move forward with the deployment of this technology. Also, a draft compliance option was prepared to facilitate this technology's incorporation into the California Energy Commission's residential energy compliance process. Determining a path of compliance of this technology will allow it to receive proper credit for incentives under the California Advanced Home Program, and will give policymakers the information they need to make policy decisions that will encourage the adoption of this technology";s:5:"Issue";s:326:"Ground-coupled heat pumps (GCHPs) have been proven to deliver heating and cooling at higher levels of efficiency than air-source air conditioners and heat pumps. However, their application in mild climates, like California, is limited by the high cost of conventional ground heat exchangers (GHE), a component of GCHP systems.";s:13:"ProjectUpdate";N;s:12:"BenefitsDesc";s:893:"The project spurs the market for high efficiency GCHPs by evaluating and testing an innovative method to reduce the cost, which has been a barrier to more installations. The current method requires costly, specialized deep drilling rigs, that often must be transported from out of state. Using common, locally available drilling equipment for shallow bores, GHE bore drilling can be done at lower cost. This technology will be made ready for commercialization by developing modeling tools needed to properly design, size, and evaluate energy savings and to facilitate use with Title 24 compliance tools . The team plans to submit a Statewide Utility Codes and Standards Enhancement (CASE) report to the CEC as a pathway to add to their model to future Title 24 models. The project team was able to successfully integrate their model to the Department of Energy's EnergyPlus simulation program.";s:15:"SpecBenConsumer";s:175:"Increased use of GCHPs would eliminate noisy and visually unappealing outdoor condensing units. Also, GCHPs could improve comfort for residents compared to forced air systems.";s:12:"SpecBenCosts";s:679:"This project seeks to reduce the cost of GHEs for heat pumps. Affordable GCHPs may result in lower utility costs for heating and cooling, lower maintenance costs, and improved system reliability compared to forced air systems. Estimated annual energy savings is over 67 billion BTU, assuming 40,000 single family homes built annually and 10% of new homes equipped with GCHPs. Annual electric savings from cooling efficiency in new homes is roughly 1.2 million kWh. For a 2100 sq ft home and a 2 ton system, and comparing the incremental cost for a GCHP system with conventional HVAC system, the annual cost savings per home is $173, when amortized over 30 years with tax credits.";s:15:"SpecBenEconomic";N;s:18:"SpecBenEnvironment";s:164:"If ground coupled heat pump systems were installed on all new single-family homes built in 2019, 110,000 homes a year, there would be an 8500 MTCO2e GHG reduction. ";s:13:"SpecBenHealth";N;s:18:"SpecBenReliability";N;s:13:"SpecBenSafety";N;s:15:"SpecBenSecurity";N;s:7:"Results";s:0:"";s:18:"HighlightStatement";s:96:"Facilitating the design, installation, and market acceptance of low-cost ground heat exchangers.";s:20:"LeverageContributors";N;s:13:"MatchPartners";s:23:"Frontier Energy, Inc.; ";s:14:"Subcontractors";s:54:"White Box Technologies, Inc.; Frontier Energy, Inc.; ";s:15:"LocationAddress";s:19:"215 Sage St Ste 100";s:12:"LocationCity";s:5:"Davis";s:13:"LocationState";s:2:"CA";s:15:"LocationZipCode";s:5:"95616";s:14:"LocationCounty";s:6:"Solano";s:30:"LocationCalEnviroDisadvantaged";s:2:"No";s:17:"LocationLowIncome";s:3:"Yes";s:22:"LocationNativeAmerican";s:2:"No";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-121.764054";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"38.561993";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:1:"3";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:1:"4";s:13:"SiteLocations";s:27:"Davis, CA; Vacaville, CA; ";s:12:"SiteCounties";s:15:"Solano; Yolo; ";s:13:"SiteUtilities";s:0:"";s:12:"CECMgrFirstN";s:7:"Abigail";s:11:"CECMgrLastN";s:5:"Jacob";s:19:"CECMgrNameFormatted";s:14:"Jacob, Abigail";s:11:"CECMgrPhone";s:12:"916-776-0774";s:11:"CECMgrEmail";s:27:"Abigail.Jacob@energy.ca.gov";s:19:"CECMgrPositionTitle";s:0:"";s:12:"CECMgrOffice";N;s:20:"CompanyContactFirstN";s:6:"Curtis";s:19:"CompanyContactLastN";s:10:"Harrington";s:19:"CompanyContactEmail";s:24:"csharrington@ucdavis.edu";s:19:"CompanyContactTitle";s:0:"";s:9:"CompSmBus";s:3:"N/A";s:12:"CompMicroBus";s:3:"N/A";s:8:"CompDVBE";s:3:"N/A";s:14:"CompWomanOwned";s:2:"No";s:17:"CompMinorityOwned";s:2:"No";s:13:"CompLGBTOwned";s:2:"No";s:19:"IsNoteWorthyProject";s:1:"0";s:17:"FinalReportStatus";s:9:"Completed";s:10:"IsDisabled";s:1:"0";s:10:"Technology";s:20:"Electric Heat Pumps~";s:9:"Ecosystem";s:14:"Not Applicable";s:29:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaPrime";s:24:"Building Decarbonization";s:33:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaSecondary";s:0:"";s:21:"PolicyInnovationGroup";s:0:"";s:16:"FinalReportTitle";s:75:"Low-Cost, Large-Diameter Shallow Ground Loops for Ground-Coupled Heat Pumps";s:19:"FinalReportLinkAddr";s:88:"https://ww2.energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport_cms.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2021-009 ";s:5:"sites";a:3:{i:2948;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"2948";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"EPC-15-019";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:3:"766";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"3";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:0:"";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:8:"Research";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:0:"";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2006-11-13 00:00:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:8:"PIMSconv";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2019-12-30 10:41:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:6:"ajacob";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:3:"766";s:11:"AddressType";s:12:"Headquarters";s:7:"Address";s:19:"17a Arboretum Drive";s:8:"Address2";s:0:"";s:4:"City";s:5:"Davis";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:5:"95616";s:7:"ZipFive";s:5:"95616";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:1:"3";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:1:"4";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:1:"3";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-121.792962";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"38.556084";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:2:"35";s:6:"County";s:4:"Yolo";s:6:"Region";s:5:"North";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:2:"No";s:9:"LowIncome";s:3:"Yes";}i:2150;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"2150";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"EPC-15-019";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:5:"29596";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"1";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:0:"";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:8:"Research";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:0:"";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2016-08-19 10:20:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:5:"Hbird";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2019-12-30 10:40:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:6:"ajacob";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:5:"29596";s:11:"AddressType";s:12:"Headquarters";s:7:"Address";s:10:"444 4th St";s:8:"Address2";s:0:"";s:4:"City";s:5:"Davis";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:9:"956164552";s:7:"ZipFive";N;s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:1:"3";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:1:"4";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:1:"3";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-121.743464";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"38.545458";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:2:"35";s:6:"County";s:4:"Yolo";s:6:"Region";s:5:"North";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:2:"No";s:9:"LowIncome";s:3:"Yes";}i:2151;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"2151";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"EPC-15-019";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:5:"29597";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"2";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:0:"";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:8:"Research";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:0:"";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2016-08-19 10:28:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:5:"Hbird";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2019-12-30 10:40:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:6:"ajacob";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:5:"29597";s:11:"AddressType";s:12:"Headquarters";s:7:"Address";s:19:"3148 Vaca Valley Rd";s:8:"Address2";s:0:"";s:4:"City";s:9:"Vacaville";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:9:"956889720";s:7:"ZipFive";N;s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:1:"3";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:2:"11";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:1:"3";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-122.012852";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"38.380026";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:2:"35";s:6:"County";s:6:"Solano";s:6:"Region";s:5:"North";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:2:"No";s:9:"LowIncome";s:2:"No";}}}
-121.764054
38.561993

Davis, CA

3rd
4th
POINT (-121.764054 38.561993)
Project Member

Curtis Harrington

Rocket

White Box Technologies, Inc.

Rocket

Frontier Energy, Inc.

Rocket
Rocket

Frontier Energy, Inc.

Rocket
The goals of this Agreement are to:

Improve market conditions for GCHPs in California;

Develop and disseminate tools
Consumer Appeal

Consumer Appeal

Increased use of GCHPs would eliminate noisy and visually unappealing outdoor condensing units. Also, GCHPs could improve comfort for residents compared to forced air systems.

Lower Costs

Affordability

This project seeks to reduce the cost of GHEs for heat pumps. Affordable GCHPs may result in lower utility costs for heating and cooling, lower maintenance costs, and improved system reliability compared to forced air systems. Estimated annual energy savings is over 67 billion BTU, assuming 40,000 single family homes built annually and 10% of new homes equipped with GCHPs. Annual electric savings from cooling efficiency in new homes is roughly 1.2 million kWh. For a 2100 sq ft home and a 2 ton system, and comparing the incremental cost for a GCHP system with conventional HVAC system, the annual cost savings per home is $173, when amortized over 30 years with tax credits.

Environmental & Public Health

Environmental Sustainability

If ground coupled heat pump systems were installed on all new single-family homes built in 2019, 110,000 homes a year, there would be an 8500 MTCO2e GHG reduction.

Ground-coupled heat pumps (GCHPs) have been proven to deliver heating and cooling at higher levels of efficiency than air-source air conditioners and heat pumps. However, their application in mild climates, like California, is limited by the high cost of conventional ground heat exchangers (GHE), a component of GCHP systems.

This project is researching shallow (20-30 feet deep) and large diameter (2-3 feet diameter) helical coil, ground heat exchanger designs for ground source heat pumps. This project seeks to fill the current informational void with the materials and tools needed to eliminate the risks involved with engineering this new technology into homes. To this end, the project analyzed the performance of different designs of large diameter shallow bore GHEs, produced a calibrated model that can predict the performance of these GHEs and incorporate them into industry-standard design tools, and produced the materials that the industry needs to confidently move forward with the deployment of this technology. Also, a draft compliance option was prepared to facilitate this technology's incorporation into the California Energy Commission's residential energy compliance process. Determining a path of compliance of this technology will allow it to receive proper credit for incentives under the California Advanced Home Program, and will give policymakers the information they need to make policy decisions that will encourage the adoption of this technology

The project is complete. Current GCHP model is improved by enabling better prediction of fluid temperatures in the bore. The simulated results show good agreement with field and laboratory data. This provides more accurate estimates of energy use for the system. The model was shared at ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers) conferences. ASHRAE's guidelines on heat pumps and other measures were considered a primary reference in the industry. The recipient presented its model to the CEC's Building Standards Office and discussed updating Title 24's models. The Building Standards Office will include improved performance maps which could accommodate ground couple heat pumps in future versions of the Residential ACM Reference Manual. The project team intents to submit a Statewide Utility Codes and Standards Enhancement Report in the next Title 24 update.

The project spurs the market for high efficiency GCHPs by evaluating and testing an innovative method to reduce the cost, which has been a barrier to more installations. The current method requires costly, specialized deep drilling rigs, that often must be transported from out of state. Using common, locally available drilling equipment for shallow bores, GHE bore drilling can be done at lower cost. This technology will be made ready for commercialization by developing modeling tools needed to properly design, size, and evaluate energy savings and to facilitate use with Title 24 compliance tools . The team plans to submit a Statewide Utility Codes and Standards Enhancement (CASE) report to the CEC as a pathway to add to their model to future Title 24 models. The project team was able to successfully integrate their model to the Department of Energy's EnergyPlus simulation program.

Facilitating the design, installation, and market acceptance of low-cost ground heat exchangers.

icon
$1,212,186
$18,826
$1,137,234
url
0

Davis, CA

Davis, CA

Vacaville, CA

Project Owners
Project CAMS
Project Supervisors

A Transformative Flywheel R&D Project

30820
Amber Kinetics, Inc.
0
Closed
EPC-15-016
a:84:{s:9:"ProjectID";s:5:"30820";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"EPC-15-016";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:18:"SolicitationNumber";s:10:"PON-13-302";s:7:"Company";s:20:"Amber Kinetics, Inc.";s:12:"ProjectTitle";s:37:"A Transformative Flywheel R&D Project";s:13:"ProjectAmount";s:12:"2000000.0000";s:11:"MatchAmount";s:12:"7500000.0000";s:16:"EncumberedAmount";s:12:"2000000.0000";s:19:"GrossInvoicedAmount";s:12:"1997631.1000";s:15:"LeveragedAmount";s:5:".0000";s:9:"AwardDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:9:"StartDate";s:19:"2016-01-27 00:00:00";s:7:"EndDate";s:19:"2018-03-30 00:00:00";s:13:"ActualEndDate";s:19:"1900-01-01 00:00:00";s:13:"ProjectStatus";s:6:"Closed";s:14:"InvestmentPlan";s:2:"10";s:14:"InvestmentArea";s:2:"10";s:18:"StrategicObjective";s:0:"";s:7:"Program";s:4:"EPIC";s:11:"ProgramArea";s:37:"Energy Technology Systems Integration";s:10:"ValueChain";s:22:"Demand-side Management";s:9:"Customers";s:77:"Commercial Businesses : Miscellaneous~ Industrial Facilities : Miscellaneous~";s:6:"Topics";s:24:"Storage : Miscellaneous~";s:18:"ProjectDescription";s:409:"This project developed advanced manufacturing processes and improved the flywheel rotor geometries. The project built on developments that the Amber Kinetics flywheel team has made in the areas of enhanced materials processing for better strength, longer life, and improved rotor geometries to maximize energy storage density and reduce the costs. The team also conducted extensive performance testing. [br /]";s:5:"Issue";s:496:"Many of the promising energy storage solutions - those with the potential to dramatically reduce cost - are still in the early stages of development. To be commercially viable as an alternative for California's aggressive storage needs, near-commercial energy storage systems require advancements, in both design and manufacturing, to improve performance and reduce costs. Demonstrations are also critical to provide proof of such factors as safety, reliability, discharge duration, and low cost.";s:13:"ProjectUpdate";N;s:12:"BenefitsDesc";s:375:"This project is built on developments that the Amber Kinetics team has made in the areas of improved materials processing for better strength and longer life, as well as improved rotor geometries to maximize energy storage density, thus reducing the cost of the system. The project adds to the energy storage portfolio of options necessary to meet California's storage needs.";s:15:"SpecBenConsumer";s:0:"";s:12:"SpecBenCosts";s:314:"Amber Kinetics substantially improved the commercial readiness of the flywheel system, utilizing the most advanced design and manufacturing techniques available to drive down the cost of flywheel energy storage systems to compete with other existing energy storage technologies (e.g., Lithium-ion, sodium sulfur ).";s:15:"SpecBenEconomic";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenEnvironment";s:221:"Amber Kinetics flywheels have no emissions, consume no water, emit no noise, have no risk of fire or hazardous material spills, and are fully recyclable making them an excellent solution to California's energy challenge. ";s:13:"SpecBenHealth";s:0:"";s:18:"SpecBenReliability";s:562:"The current grid needs reliable energy storage to allow high penetration of renewable resources such as wind and solar. Amber Kinetics project has demonstrated the flywheel energy storage system that can potentially solve the multiples challenges on the grid. The team improved flywheel technology that has a four-hour discharge capability, and is a cost-effective solution that does not degrade over time and can operate in a wide range of environmental conditions without heating, or cooling which reduces system operating losses and improves grid reliability.";s:13:"SpecBenSafety";s:379:"Amber Kinetics improved the design of the flywheel and the installation design (below grade or in earth berms) and demonstrated its safety through substantial testing. This performance helps to overcome perceptions of safety issues with flywheels based on past incidents from other flywheel manufacturers that has reduced interest in flywheels as a safe energy storage device. ";s:15:"SpecBenSecurity";s:0:"";s:7:"Results";s:0:"";s:18:"HighlightStatement";s:63:"A flywheel energy storage system that is low cost and efficient";s:20:"LeverageContributors";N;s:13:"MatchPartners";s:22:"Amber Kinetics, Inc.; ";s:14:"Subcontractors";s:13:"Steve Errea; ";s:15:"LocationAddress";s:36:"32920 Alvarado Niles Road, Suite 250";s:12:"LocationCity";s:11:"Union City ";s:13:"LocationState";s:2:"CA";s:15:"LocationZipCode";s:5:"94587";s:14:"LocationCounty";s:7:"Alameda";s:30:"LocationCalEnviroDisadvantaged";s:3:"Yes";s:17:"LocationLowIncome";s:2:"No";s:22:"LocationNativeAmerican";s:2:"No";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-121.943838";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"37.475444";s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:2:"10";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:2:"25";s:13:"SiteLocations";s:28:"Alameda, CA; San Ardo, CA; ";s:12:"SiteCounties";s:20:"Alameda; Monterey; ";s:13:"SiteUtilities";s:0:"";s:12:"CECMgrFirstN";s:5:"Ostap";s:11:"CECMgrLastN";s:16:"Loredo-Contreras";s:19:"CECMgrNameFormatted";s:23:"Loredo-Contreras, Ostap";s:11:"CECMgrPhone";s:12:"916-327-1552";s:11:"CECMgrEmail";s:36:"ostap.loredo-contreras@energy.ca.gov";s:19:"CECMgrPositionTitle";s:30:"Energy Commission Specialist I";s:12:"CECMgrOffice";N;s:20:"CompanyContactFirstN";s:4:"Will";s:19:"CompanyContactLastN";s:10:"Sutherland";s:19:"CompanyContactEmail";s:29:"wsutherland@amberkinetics.com";s:19:"CompanyContactTitle";s:28:"SVP Manufacturing Operations";s:9:"CompSmBus";s:3:"N/A";s:12:"CompMicroBus";s:3:"N/A";s:8:"CompDVBE";s:3:"N/A";s:14:"CompWomanOwned";s:2:"No";s:17:"CompMinorityOwned";s:2:"No";s:13:"CompLGBTOwned";s:2:"No";s:19:"IsNoteWorthyProject";s:1:"0";s:17:"FinalReportStatus";s:9:"Completed";s:10:"IsDisabled";s:1:"0";s:10:"Technology";s:15:"Energy Storage~";s:9:"Ecosystem";s:14:"Not Applicable";s:29:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaPrime";s:41:"Grid Decarbonization and Decentralization";s:33:"TechnologyInvestmentAreaSecondary";s:0:"";s:21:"PolicyInnovationGroup";s:0:"";s:16:"FinalReportTitle";s:124:"Flywheel Systems for Utility Scale Energy Storage A transformative Flywheel R&D Project - Prepared for Commercial Readiness ";s:19:"FinalReportLinkAddr";s:80:"https://ww2.energy.ca.gov/2019publications/CEC-500-2019-012/CEC-500-2019-012.pdf";s:5:"sites";a:2:{i:2723;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"2723";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"EPC-15-016";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:5:"31174";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"1";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:13:"Errea's Ranch";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:13:"Demonstration";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:0:"";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2017-11-07 10:24:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:7:"oloredo";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2017-11-07 10:40:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:7:"oloredo";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:5:"31174";s:11:"AddressType";s:12:"Headquarters";s:7:"Address";s:22:"56501 Pine Valley Road";s:8:"Address2";s:0:"";s:4:"City";s:8:"San Ardo";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:5:"93450";s:7:"ZipFive";N;s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:2:"17";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:2:"30";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:2:"20";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-120.891834";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"36.089386";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:2:"19";s:6:"County";s:8:"Monterey";s:6:"Region";s:5:"South";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:2:"No";s:9:"LowIncome";s:0:"";}i:2724;a:34:{s:13:"ProjectSiteID";s:4:"2724";s:14:"ContractNumber";s:10:"EPC-15-016";s:13:"ProjectNumber";s:1:"1";s:13:"SiteAddressID";s:5:"28830";s:10:"SiteNumber";s:1:"2";s:16:"SiteFacilityDesc";s:16:"Test Facility #2";s:12:"SiteCategory";s:13:"Demonstration";s:14:"EnterpriseZone";s:1:"0";s:8:"Comments";s:0:"";s:11:"CreatedDate";s:19:"2016-01-26 09:31:00";s:9:"CreatedBy";s:5:"ecary";s:12:"ModifiedDate";s:19:"2017-11-07 10:42:00";s:10:"ModifiedBy";s:7:"oloredo";s:11:"UtilityArea";N;s:9:"AddressID";s:5:"28830";s:11:"AddressType";s:5:"Other";s:7:"Address";s:21:"641 W. Redline Avenue";s:8:"Address2";s:0:"";s:4:"City";s:7:"Alameda";s:5:"State";s:2:"CA";s:7:"Country";s:3:"USA";s:7:"ZipCode";s:5:"94501";s:7:"ZipFive";N;s:20:"SenateDistrictNumber";s:1:"9";s:22:"AssemblyDistrictNumber";s:2:"18";s:27:"CongressionalDistrictNumber";s:2:"13";s:10:"LongitudeX";s:11:"-122.278048";s:9:"LatitudeY";s:9:"37.774084";s:9:"IsPrivate";s:1:"0";s:17:"AirDistrictNumber";s:1:"3";s:6:"County";s:7:"Alameda";s:6:"Region";s:5:"North";s:28:"CalEnviroScreenDisAdvantaged";s:2:"No";s:9:"LowIncome";s:0:"";}}}
-121.943838
37.475444

Union City , CA

10th
25th
POINT (-121.943838 37.475444)
Project Member

Will Sutherland

SVP Manufacturing Operations
Rocket

Steve Errea

Rocket
Rocket

Amber Kinetics, Inc.

Rocket
Lower Costs

Affordability

Amber Kinetics substantially improved the commercial readiness of the flywheel system, utilizing the most advanced design and manufacturing techniques available to drive down the cost of flywheel energy storage systems to compete

Environmental & Public Health

Environmental Sustainability

Amber Kinetics flywheels have no emissions, consume no water, emit no noise, have no risk of fire or hazardous material spills, and are fully recyclable making them an excellent solution to California's energy challenge.

Greater Reliability

Reliability

The current grid needs reliable energy storage to allow high penetration of renewable resources such as wind and solar. Amber Kinetics project has demonstrated the flywheel energy storage system that can potentially solve the mul

Increase Safety

Safety

Amber Kinetics improved the design of the flywheel and the installation design (below grade or in earth berms) and demonstrated its safety through substantial testing. This performance helps to overcome perceptions of safety iss

Many of the promising energy storage solutions - those with the potential to dramatically reduce cost - are still in the early stages of development. To be commercially viable as an alternative for California's aggressive storage needs, near-commercial energy storage systems require advancements, in both design and manufacturing, to improve performance and reduce costs. Demonstrations are also critical to provide proof of such factors as safety, reliability, discharge duration, and low cost.

This project developed advanced manufacturing processes and improved the flywheel rotor geometries. The project built on developments that the Amber Kinetics flywheel team has made in the areas of enhanced materials processing for better strength, longer life, and improved rotor geometries to maximize energy storage density and reduce the costs. The team also conducted extensive performance testing. [br /]

Amber Kinetics completed their commercial readiness tests of more than 25,000 operating hours. They performed safety validation with burst tests to analyze and improve the flywheel containment design. For grid connection using multi-unit arrays, Amber Kinetics developed communication protocols, multi-array connectivity, charge and discharge operations, and control algorithms for coordinating multiple flywheels, which would be needed in a utility scale deployment. They collected flywheel operational data under real-world conditions to prove the design robustness, reliability, round-trip efficiency, and the ability to balance power and control the state of charge. As a result, Amber Kinetics is expanding its business opportunities in Massachusetts and Australia. A final report was published: [a href="https://www.energy.ca.gov/2019publications/CEC-500-2019-012/CEC-500-201…]

This project is built on developments that the Amber Kinetics team has made in the areas of improved materials processing for better strength and longer life, as well as improved rotor geometries to maximize energy storage density, thus reducing the cost of the system. The project adds to the energy storage portfolio of options necessary to meet California's storage needs.

A flywheel energy storage system that is low cost and efficient

icon
$2,000,000
$7,500,000
$1,997,631
url
0

San Ardo, CA

Alameda, CA

Scalability

As a result of this project in October 2018, Amber Kinetics had achieved the commercial release of the M32 flywheel product with the company first shipping production units from their first manufacturing facility.. This will give California IOU’s new choices when addressing their energy storage needs. A robust and healthy marketplace for energy storage solutions is vital to supporting California’s clean energy goals.

Project Owners
Project CAMS